Archive for the ‘Testing’ Category

Intro to Hypothyroidism Symptoms and Treatment

Monday, January 17th, 2011

Video from Dr. Mercola. A great introduction to hypothyroidism.

Notes from the video clip below:

If your TSH blood test is over 1.5 (not 5.0) you likely are hypothyroid, confirm this with a free T3 and free T4 tests

Iodine deficiency is a common cause of hypothyroidism. Get enough Iodine , use SSKI to get Iodine

Avoid soy (it induces hypothyroidism) especially un-fermented soy

Use coconut oil

If you are hypothyroid, hormones can be used, Synthroid (T4) and other synthetic hormones are not recommended. If you have not been on synthetic hormones for a long time using armour thyroid is better (gives you T1, T2, T3 and T4). Eventually you may be able to not need hormones at all. Your allopathic physician will prescribe synthetic drugs, a holistic doctor will prescribe armour thyroid instead.

Enjoy:

I take Iodoral or Lugols and eat sea weed to get iodine into my diet. I do “not” use table salt. Table salt should be avoided. Also cruciferous vegetables inhibit the thyroid and they should be steamed before being eaten to remedy this.

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How is Patterned Baldness Tested for?

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Evaluation for causative disorders should be done based on clinical symptoms. A mainstream physician wont do much if any testing once they’ve determined their patient has male-pattern and female-pattern hair loss. Many readily available blood, urine and saliva tests could be done to understand metabolic, hormonal and nutritional issues in the body. Other articles will discuss these further.

These are hair tests that could be done on the scalp/hair itself:

The pull test: to evaluate diffuse scalp hair loss. Gentle traction is exerted on a group of hair (about 40–60) on three different areas of the scalp. The number of extracted hairs is counted and examined under a microscope. Normally, <3 hairs per area should come out with each pull. If >10 hairs are obtained, the pull test is considered positive.

The pluck test: In this test, the individual pulls hair out “by the roots.” The root of the plucked hair is examined under a microscope to determine the phase of growth and used to diagnose a defect of telogen, anagen, or systemic disease. Telogen hairs are hairs that have tiny bulbs without sheaths at their roots. Telogen effluvium shows an increased percentage of hairs upon examination. Anagen hairs are hairs that have sheaths attached to their roots. Anagen effluvium shows a decrease in telogen-phase hairs and an increased number of broken hairs.

Hair mineral analysis: Tests for minerals and heavy metals.

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Scalp biopsy: This test is done when alopecia is present, but the diagnosis is unsure. The biopsy allows for differing between scarring and nonscarring forms. Hair samples are taken from areas of inflammation, usually around the border of the bald patch.

Daily Hair Counts: This is normally done when the pull test is negative. It is done by counting the number of hairs lost. The hair that should be counted are the hairs from the first morning combing or during washing. The hair is collected in a clear plastic bag for 14 days. The strands are recorded. If the hair count is >100/day is considered abnormal except after shampooing, where hair counts will be up 250 and be normal.

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