Archive for the ‘Dairy’ Category

Fermented Cod Liver Oil, Vitamin Butter Oil and Coconut Ghee

Friday, June 10th, 2011

Green Pasture makes three products that are worth trying. These are popular with the people who like to eat traditional diets..

They are created in the traditional foods method, similar to what Dr Weston Price found the ingenious communities eating in his research.. If you want that X-Factor (vitamin K2) Weston Price talked about go for the Butter Oil, if you want vitamins D3 and A in a traditionally-prepared non-processed fish oil go for the Fermented Cod Liver Oil.. If you love coconut oil checkout the coconut Ghee..

Fermented Cod Liver Oil:
“Many of the great historical cultures had one sacred food which they relied on to ensure strong mind, body, and spirit; fermented fish/fish liver oil. The Might Roman Soldier was given a daily ration of fermented fish oil. The Stoic Scandinavian Viking had a drum of fermenting cod livers outside the door of his home. Grandma always had a bottle of cod liver oil in the back cupboard.”

High Vitamin Butter Oil:
“Combines X-Factor™ Gold High Vitamin Butter Oil with Blue Ice™ Fermented Cod Liver Oil to provide our community with a pure, clean and nutrient rich sacred food.”

Organic Coconut GHEE:
“A perfect blend of non-heated butter wax extract and organic, virgin coconut oil will make this the family favorite for all your cooking, baking and nutritional fat needs. Casein and lactose free”

What is Ghee any way?
Ghee is widely used in Indian cuisine. However, it is mentioned in the Epic of Gilgamesh, and is probably Akkadian in origin. In many parts of India and Pakistan, especially in Punjab, Haryana, Gujarat, Maharashtra, Bengal, Orissa and many other states, rice is traditionally prepared or served with ghee (including biryani).

In the Bharuch district of Gujarat, Ghee is served with kichdi, usually an evening meal of yellow rice with curry, a sauce made from yoghurt, cumin seeds, kari leaves, ghee, cornflour, tumeric, garlic and salt. Ghee is also an ingredient as well as used in the preparation of kadhi and used in Indian and Pakistani sweets such as Mysore pak, and different varieties of halva and laddu. Punjabi cuisine prepared in restaurants uses large amounts of ghee. Naan and roti are sometimes brushed with ghee, either during preparation or while serving.

(more…)

What Milk to Consume

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

This is a very common question, most would consider organic milk sold in stores as healthy milk. You should know that “organic milk” really means almost nothing special, it may mean there are no antibiotics or hormones in the milk but it does not mean the milk is good. Why? because it is heavily processed and it still comes from cows that did not eat grass and ones likely confined indoors.

Milk that has been pasteurized, homogenized, reinforced, heated, skimmed is simply adulterated milk that should be avoided. Adulterated milk (modern day every day milk) has been shown in studies to be linked to acne and hair loss. Milk, especially cow milk that has been adulterated causes scalp itching, inflammation and with continuous use could cause insulin resistance and a myriad of diseases related with that. Many people are lactose intolerant as well.

Raw milk from older breeds like the Jersey or the African (A2 cows) contain the amino acid proline in the beta-casein protein while in the younger breeds like the Holsteins (A1 cows) the proline amino acid has mutated and as a result causes many of the allergic reactions in people.

This is important because beta-casein also contains an amino acid called BCM-7, which is a powerful opiate linked to negative health effects. The proline that exists in A2 cows has a strong bond to BCM-7, which helps keep it out of the cows’ milk. The histidine in the newer A1 cows, however, has a weak hold on BCM-7, which allows it to get into the milk, and also into the people who drink the milk. The theory goes that by drinking milk from A1 cows, which are the predominant cows used for dairy products in the United States, you’re exposed to BCM-7 and BCM-7 has been linked to:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
An automatic insert of some related ads:

Thanks for your patronage. Article continues below:
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

  • Neurological impairment, including autistic and schizophrenic changes
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • An impaired immune response
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Heart disease…

Read more on this at “The Bovine – In response to Mercola’s Article on Raw Milk: http://thebovine.wordpress.com/2009/07/10/mercola-advocates-raw-milk-discusses-a1-a2-beta-casein-in-connection-with-autism-diabetes-heart-disease-etc/

(more…)

Fermented Foods of the World!

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

All the links below link to Wikipedia articles for more info on each of these fermented foods

Fermented Foods:

A Modified Elimination Diet

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

This is one version of a modified Elimination Diet that I like. It removes any possible allergen or inflammatory food, you most likely can tolerate most these but while on this diet the idea is to not eat anything that could remotely cause you inflammation. If some people had an inflammatory reaction then this food is listed in the Foods to Avoid column.

-::- Note: The below is posted here for archival and educational purposes -::-

Modified Elimination Diet

Foods to Include Foods to Avoid
Fruits Unsweetened fresh, frozen, water- packed, or canned; unsweetened fruit juices except orange Oranges
Vegetables All fresh raw, steamed, sautéed,juiced, or roasted vegetables Corn; creamed vegetables
Starch Rice, oats, millet, quinoa, amaranth,teff, tapioca, buckwheat Wheat, corn, barley, spelt, kamut, rye;all gluten-containing products
Bread/Cereal Products made from rice, oat, buckwheat, millet, potato flour, tapioca, arrowroot, amaranth, quinoa Products made from wheat, spelt, kamut, rye, barley; all gluten- containing products
Legumes All beans, peas, and lentils unlessotherwise indicated Soybeans†, tofu, tempeh, soybeans,soy milk, other soy products
Nuts and Seeds Almonds, cashews, walnuts; sesame (tahini), sunflower, and pumpkin seeds; butters made from these nuts and seeds Peanuts, peanut butter
Fats Cold-expeller pressed olive, flax, canola, safflower, sunflower, sesame, walnut, pumpkin, or almond oils Margarine, butter, shortening, processed (hydrogenated) oils, mayonnaise, spreads
Beverages Filtered or distilled water, herbal tea, seltzer or mineral water Soda pop or soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, coffee, tea, other caffeinated beverages
Spices & Condiments All spices unless otherwise indicated. For example, use: cinnamon, cumin, dill, garlic, ginger, carob, oregano, parsley, rosemary, tarragon, thyme, turmeric, vinegar Chocolate††, ketchup, mustard, relish, chutney, soy sauce, barbeque sauce, other condiments
Sweeteners Brown rice syrup, fruit sweetener,blackstrap molasses, stevia White or brown refined sugar, honey, maple syrup, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, candy; desserts made with these sweeteners
†Note that soy is an ingredient in some of the recommended medical foods and supplement formulas. Therefore,those products are only recommended if your healthcare practitioner has determined you have no intolerance to soy.††Note that chocolate is an ingredient in some of the recommended medical foods. Therefore, those products are only recommended if your healthcare practitioner has determined you have no intolerance to chocolate.

Last Updated on Thursday, 29 January 2009 03:22

:: The diet above has been posted here for archival and educational purposes only. PLEASE do me a favor and visit the author’s website, i.e. the ORIGINAL website where this diet was found, by following this link, and considering using their services and/or visiting their sponsors’ websites: http://www.ecopolitan.com/health-services/eco-healing/ ::

Free-IGF-1 lowers SHBG | Acne, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Hyperinsulinemia and Diet

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

1)

Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1584-90.
Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization.

Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J.
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. cordain@cahs.colostate.edu
Comment in:
* Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1591-2.
* Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):941; author reply 942-3.
* Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):941-2; author reply 942-3.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In westernized societies, acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79% to 95% of the adolescent population. In men and women older than 25 years, 40% to 54% have some degree of facial acne, and clinical facial acne persists into middle age in 12% of women and 3% of men. Epidemiological evidence suggests that acne incidence rates are considerably lower in nonwesternized societies. Herein we report the prevalence of acne in 2 nonwesternized populations: the Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and the Aché hunter-gatherers of Paraguay. Additionally, we analyze how elements in nonwesternized environments may influence the development of acne.

OBSERVATIONS: Of 1200 Kitavan subjects examined (including 300 aged 15-25 years), no case of acne (grade 1 with multiple comedones or grades 2-4) was observed. Of 115 Aché subjects examined (including 15 aged 15-25 years) over 843 days, no case of active acne (grades 1-4) was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: The astonishing difference in acne incidence rates between nonwesternized and fully modernized societies cannot be solely attributed to genetic differences among populations but likely results from differing environmental factors. Identification of these factors may be useful in the treatment of acne in Western populations.

PMID: 12472346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

(more…)

Americans should eat the traditional foods that nourished their ancestors

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Quotes:

It is true that beef consumption in the United States has gone up during the last eighty years, the period of huge increases in heart disease. Today we consume 79 pounds of beef per person per year versus 54 in 1909, a 46% increase—but poultry consumption has increased a whopping 280%, from 18 pounds per person per year to 70. Consumption of vegetable oils, including those that have been hydrogenated, has increased 437%, from 11 pounds per person per year to 59; while consumption of butter, lard and tallow has plummeted from 30 pounds per person per year to just under 10. Whole milk consumption has declined by almost 50%, while lowfat milk consumption has doubled. Consumption of eggs, fresh fruits (excluding citrus), fresh vegetables, fresh potatoes and whole grain products has declined; but consumption of sugar and other sweeteners has almost doubled. Why, then, do today’s politically correct dietary gurus continue to blame beef consumption for our ills? Is it because it is the one wholesome food that has shown an increase over the past ninety years?

It was in the same year, 1966, that the results of Dr. Jolliffe’s Anti-Coronary Club experiment were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.12 Those on the Prudent Diet of corn oil, margarine, fish, chicken and cold cereal had an average serum cholesterol of 220, compared to 250 in the meat-and-potatoes control group.

By 1950 butter consumption had dropped from eighteen pounds per person per year to just over ten. Margarine filled in the gap, rising from about two pounds per person at the turn of the century to about eight. Consumption of vegetable shortening—used in crackers and baked goods—remained relatively steady at about twelve pounds per person per year but vegetable oil consumption had more than tripled—from just under three pounds per person per year to more than ten.3

The statistics pointed to one obvious conclusion—Americans should eat the traditional foods that nourished their ancestors, including meat, eggs, butter and cheese, and avoid the newfangled vegetable-oil-based foods that were flooding the grocers’ shelves;

(more…)



Disclaimer: I must say this: The information presented herein is for informational purposes only. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements, making dietary changes, or before making any changes in prescribed medications.
All posts are strictly opinions meant to foster debate, education, comment, teaching, scholarship and research under the "fair use doctrine" in Section 107 of U.S. Code Title 17. No statement of fact is made and/or should be implied. Please verify all the articles on this site for yourself. The Information found here should in no way to be construed as medical advice. If You have a health issue please consult your professional medical provider. Everything here is the authors own personal opinion as reported by authors based on their personal perception and interpretation as a part of authors freedom of speech. Nothing reported here should be taken as medical advice, diagnosis or prescription; medical advice should only be taken from your health care provider. Consume the information found on this web site under your own responsibility. Please, do your own research; reach your own conclusions, and take personal responsibility and personal control of your health.