Archive for the ‘Magnesium’ Category

Is Salt Good of Bad?

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Doctors and dietitians, along with the USDA dietary guidelines, and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend eating a diet low in sodium to prevent hypertension, risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke; most allopathic doctors place their patients on low-salt diets, they have since the 1970′s.

Not all salts are created equal. Many in the “Raw Food” movement (which has some great ideas to offer) shun salt away and even call it a poison. They fail to differentiate the different types of salts, table salt might be thought of as poison (or unhealthy) while other salts that are healthier do exist. Some salts actually increase mortality as I will show below.

Salt is an essential nutrient, unlike sugar, people ate salt for eons. Historically, humans recognized it’s importance enough to use it as currency. Its reputation is found in phrases like “Worth his/her salt,” or “Not worth his/her salt”  since people were often paid in salt. In fact, the word salt is derived from the Latin salarium, or salary. In fact, you could die without salt. Like I said, you need salt, “the right kind of salt”.

Mainstream, table, restaurant, shaker and processed food salts are often mixed with anti-caking agents, many avoid salt all together in order to avoid these added chemicals. Salt takes a large portion of the mainstream American awareness. People think it is an unnecessary additive, and guided by their allopathic doctors and government dietary guidelines they seek products that are salt-free. The situation with salt is very similar to that with fat, most Americans seek fat-free products failing to recognize that not all fat is bad.

Like fat, salt is an essential nutrient to life. The food industry might have transformed most of the salt into an unhealthy form of salt, but this is not to say that salt is bad. This is the case with fat, protein, rice, etc.. Many foods that are very healthy and essential become denatured and poisoned when commercially processed and packaged.

 

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About Magnesium

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Most of us are deficient in magnesium.

While this macro-mineral is easily obtained from many foods, magnesium deficiencies are extremely common for many Americans. Alcohol consumption, the presence of fluoride, and the consumption of certain foods either increase our need for magnesium, or decrease its absorption. Magnesium is not only one of the key nutrients required in both calcium utilization and protein synthesis, but it also plays a tremendous role in virtually every enzymatic reaction in our body.

Magnesium is a mineral that is critical for energy production and metabolism, muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission and bone mineralization. It is required cofactor for an estimated 300 enzymes. Among the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes are fatty acid synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose metabolism.

Essential for:

  • Nervous System Support
  • Energy Production
  • Enzyme Function
  • Bone health
  • Sleep and calmness
  • Decalcification
  • Regular bowel movement
  • Muscles and leg cramps

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Magnesium ions are essential to the basic nucleic acid chemistry of life, and 80 percent of the enzymes in the body need Mg in order to function. Mg deficiency can affect every organ system in the body. In skeletal muscles, Mg deficiency causes twitches, cramps, back aches, neck pain, tension headaches. With the heart Mg deficiency can cause angina (from spasm of the coronary arteries), high blood pressure, and rhythm disturbances, including sudden death.

Dr. Donald Miller

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Magnesium Supplements

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

Here are your options:

 

1) My favorite (affordable and reliable)

Now Foods, Magnesium Citrate, 120 Vcaps
http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Magnesium-Citrate-120-Vcaps/698

The capsules are better than tablets, based on my experience, my research and also common sense. They are absorbed faster and are also easier to swallow.

 

2)

Magnesium caps 400 mg Now 180 caps

Swanson Ultra Albion Chelated Magnesium Glycinate  133 mg 90 Caps

The best choice possibly being this one: Chelated Mag powder: Magnesium Citrate powder (900mg/d)  (1/2tsp 3 times a day; 945mg/d)

iHerb: Now-Foods-Magnesium-Citrate-100-Pure-Powder 8 oz 227g
http://www.swansonvitamins.com/NWF620/ItemDetail?n=4294959665
3)

Magnesium (Mg) – 900 mg/day, in 6 tablets of Magnesium Citramate (Thorne  Research)

http://www.easycart.net/cgi-bin/BeyondACenturyInc./search.cgi

Also you can get the more affordable Magnesium Citrate powder from Now foods

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Weston Price – That a Clean Tooth Does Not Decay and that Mouth Cleanliness Affords the Best Known Protection Against Dental Caries

Sunday, December 12th, 2010

This article is posted here for “preservation” and archival reasons, sometimes you come across information online that you want to make sure others read, but the internet world is ever-changing, something maybe available today and gone tomorrow, thus I sometimes re-post articles like the one below here but take NO CREDIT for any of them.

Here is the article:

Weston Price – That a Clean Tooth Does Not Decay and that Mouth Cleanliness Affords the Best Known Protection Against Dental Caries.

Dental Cosmos Page 871 1934: by Weston A Price, DDS:

Oral cleanliness is not the best known means for the control of dental caries because:

(I) Since primitive man has had high immunity to dental caries he becomes our control in the great experiment of civilizations.

It is essential there fore, that we study the controlling factors of his environment, of which he is the product, and use these as our yardstick for studying modern civilization.

For this I have studied remnants of several primitive racial stocks where their physical isolation had sheltered them from the influences of our modern civilization, and by studying them and their foods and their methods of living, certain underlying factors are found to be common to all these primitive groups, even though they were living in different countries and on very different foods. This permits us to critically analyze modern civilizations at their points of contact with the primitives and, by studying them and their problems with the standards of immune primitives, not the factors which are contributing to dental caries.

By studying the children in four isolated valley in Switzerland; Loetschental, Visperterminen, Grachen, and Ayer in the Swiss Alps, I found the incidence of dental caries to be only 4.6 percent of the teeth studied. Here oral prophylaxis and modern equipment for practicing it were largely unknown. At St. Moritz, however, at approximately the same altitude, which is highly modernized community with excellent training in oral prophylaxis, the incidence of caries was 29.8 per cent of teeth studied.

At Vissoie and Zinal, which were partially modernized, 22 percent of the teeth examined had been attacked by dental caries. At Herisau, in the plains country of Switzerland, also a highly modernized community with splendid instruction and equipment for mouth cleanliness, the incidence of cares was 24.7 per cent of the teeth examined.

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Ending Inflammation

Friday, December 10th, 2010

What can I do about inflammation?

Inflammation could be caused by many factors, therein lies the challenge of knowing what is causing such inflammation. Fixing the problem at it’s root is much better than masking it.

Topically:

  • Emu oil (comment: I have not tried this)
  • copper peptides
  • ketoconazole can be used to topically partially inhibit cytokine formation.
  • Essential oils (comment: easy to apply)
  • Anything that kills scalp parasites can help reduce localized scalp inflammation
  • ACV (comment: good)
  • Kefir (comment: tried it, works but messy)
  • Xylitol (comment: I have not tried)

Diet:

Diet and nutrition:

  • Ecklonia Cava Extract (rich in phlorotannins/polyphenols with uniquely strong antioxidant properties)
  • Curcumin 95% (95% curcuminoids including curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which are antioxidants)
  • Krill Oil
  • R-Lipoic Acid (anti Oxidant)
  • Fish oil
  • DHEA
  • Stinging Nettle extract
  • GLA
  • Other antioxidants (vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine)

Read the anti-inflammatory diets posted on this website. This website has a few anti inflammatory diets and diet recommendations. To find them visit:

You should consider finding food sensitivities that you have that might be sub-clinical. These could be causing chronic inflammation that you have grown accustomed to. The best way to find foods that don’t sit well with you is to go on the elimination diet then slowly reintroduce one food item at a time. You may enjoy the benefits of eliminating foods enough to not even care to re-introduce some items.

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Acta Cardiol. 1987;42(3):187-206. “Does sodium play an adverse role in hypertension?”

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

Acta Cardiol. 1987;42(3):187-206.

Does sodium play an adverse role in hypertension?

Singh RB, Singh NK, Mody R, Cameron EA.

Medical Hospital and Research Centre, Moradabad.

Abstract

It is clear that salt is known to be a health hazard from the ancient times. Sodium intake, which was minimal during evolution, increased significantly with the civilization. The rise in prevalence of hypertension in populations with increased consumption of salt suggested a casual relationship. However, several of these studies showed conflicting results.

Many investigators agree that salt-sensitive persons often have a family history of hypertension. Such individuals possess a sodium transport inhibitor in the arterial smooth muscle cells, which affects their sodium handling (as compared to other persons).

However, many of the putative defects related to sodium can be dissociated from blood pressure and sodium consumption status. It is possible that calcium defects of deficiency of potassium and magnesium follow hypertension and sodium status. For example, the pressure response to sodium chloride may be dissociated from sodium, which may be secondary to adverse effects of chloride on calcium homeostasis. Clinical studies also indicate that the role of sodium is controversial in hypertension.

Sodium restriction can benefit salt-sensitive persons and might not otherwise. However, most authorities believe that moderation of salt intake to a relevant extent is justifiable.

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Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, Phosphate, Vitamin D and Hypertention in Dahl Rats – Sources

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

Clin Exp Hypertens. 1998 Oct;20(7):795-815.

Hypertension development in Dahl S and R rats on high salt-low potassium diet: calcium, magnesium and sympathetic nervous system.

Wu X, Ackermann U, Sonnenberg H.

Department of Physiology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Dietary combination of high salt with low potassium (HSLK) exacerbates hypertension development in Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rats, and produces a mild degree of hypertension in otherwise salt-resistant (R) rats. Increased blood pressure in both strains is associated with increased urinary excretion of calcium and magnesium. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of blood pressure on body balance of these ions in Dahl rats on HSLK diet. Two groups of S and two groups of R weanlings were all placed on HSLK diet (NaCl=8%, K=0.2%) for eight weeks. One group of each strain was subjected to chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to counteract hypertension development. Urinary norepinephrine was used to determine efficacy of 6-OHDA treatment. Systolic blood pressures of conscious animals were measured daily throughout the study. The last three days on the diet were used to determine total dietary intake and urinary as well as fecal excretion of sodium, calcium and magnesium. At the end of the study, extracellular fluid volume, serum aldosterone and parathyroid hormone were analyzed. Final systolic blood pressures in the 4 groups were as follows: S=235+/-9 mmHg (n=9); R=155+/-3 mmHg (n=8); 6-OHDA S=151+/-6 mm Hg (n=8); 6-OHDA R=117+/-6 mm Hg. Chemical sympathectomy decreased blood pressure in both S and R rats. There was no indication of sodium accumulation in S rats. Associated with reduced parathyroid hormone levels the S strain had significantly less positive balance for calcium than the R strain, primarily due to increased urinary excretion. A less positive balance for magnesium was also observed, due mainly to relatively reduced intestinal absorption of the ion. We conclude that the HSLK diet is associated with inappropriate activation of the sympathetic nervous system and increased arterial pressure in both strains. In addition, since divalent cations may influence blood pressure, we suggest that the observed abnormalities in calcium and magnesium metabolism might independently promote hypertension development in the S strain.

Clin Exp Hypertens. 1995 Aug;17(6):989-1008.

Potassium depletion and salt-sensitive hypertension in Dahl rats: effect on calcium, magnesium, and phosphate excretions.

Wu X, Ackermann U, Sonnenberg H.

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J Natl Med Assoc. 1990 Dec;82(12):837-40. “Hypertension induction in Dahl rats”

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

J Natl Med Assoc. 1990 Dec;82(12):837-40.

Hypertension induction in Dahl rats.

Flowers SW, Jamal IA, Bogden J, Thanki K, Ballester H.

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Maplewood.

Abstract

There is experimental and epidemiologic evidence that some minerals and trace elements play a role in hypertension. We designed an experiment in which salt and water sources were manipulated to examine the possible impact of this relationship. A strain of rats (Dahl rats) known to become hypertensive with sodium chloride ingestion was used to study the effect of salt source and water source on the induction of hypertension.

The group on tap water and table salt had blood pressures (184 mmHg +/- 19) significantly higher than every other group in the experiment. The experimental animals receiving tap water plus table salt had the highest blood pressure levels, although they consumed the lowest quantity of sodium.

Analysis of the tap water samples showed “soft water” by analysis of calcium and magnesium concentration. This could adversely affect blood pressure.

The relatively high magnesium concentration in sun evaporated sea salt may play a protective role in hypertension induction. The zinc and copper present in tap water may play an exacerbating role.

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Pathophysiology. 2007 Dec;14(3-4):205-11. “Magnesium transport in hypertension”

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

Pathophysiology. 2007 Dec;14(3-4):205-11. Epub 2007 Oct 29.

Magnesium transport in hypertension.

Sontia B, Touyz RM.

Kidney Research Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Health Research Institute, 451 Smyth Rd, #2513, K1H 8M5 Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence indicates an inverse association between Mg(2+) levels (serum and tissue) and blood pressure. Magnesium may influence blood pressure by modulating vascular tone and structure through its effects on numerous biochemical reactions that control vascular contraction/dilation, growth/apoptosis, differentiation and inflammation. Magnesium acts as a calcium channel antagonist, it stimulates production of vasodilator prostacyclins and nitric oxide and it alters vascular responses to vasoactive agonists. Mammalian cells regulate Mg(2+) concentration through specialized influx and efflux transport systems that have only recently been characterized. Magnesium efflux occurs via Na(2+)-dependent and Na(2+)-independent pathways. Mg(2+) influx is controlled by recently cloned transporters including Mrs2p, SLC41A1, SLC41A1, ACDP2, MagT1, TRPM6 and TRPM7. Alterations in some of these systems may contribute to hypomagnesemia and intracellular Mg(2+) deficiency in hypertension. In particular increased Mg(2+) efflux through altered regulation of the vascular Na(+)/Mg(2+) exchanger and decreased Mg(2+) influx due to defective vascular and renal TRPM6/7 expression/activity may be important. This review discusses the role of Mg(2+) in vascular biology and implications in hypertension and focuses on the putative transport systems that control vascular magnesium homeostasis. Much research is still needed to clarify the exact mechanisms of Mg(2+) regulation in the cardiovascular system and the implications of aberrant transcellular Mg(2+) transport in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

PMID: 18029156 [PubMed - in process]

LinkOut – more resources

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