Archive for the ‘Vitamin C’ Category

About Vitamin C

Monday, June 13th, 2011

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid) Supports hair and nail growth by improving circulation.
It might be useful in treating dandruff and thus may aid in preventing hair loss.

The benefits of vitamin C are vast, many help you be optimally healthy and thus preventing hair loss.

Vitamin C is one of the most well-known vitamins. It plays an important role as an anti-oxidant and free radical scavenger, it also is an effective antiviral agent.

The primary function of vitamin C is to assist in the production of collagen, although it is rapidly becoming identified as a key player in detoxifying the body from foreign substances. Although there is somewhat limited documentation, other reported uses of vitamin C are healing wounds and burns, accelerate healing after surgery, decreasing blood cholesterol, reduce blood clotting, offer protection against cancer agents, and extend life.

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, i.e. it is not stored in the body fat, it must be regularly replenished and is commonly found in fresh fruits, especially in the citrus family that is dominated by oranges, lemons, limes, and tangerines also in green leafy vegetables.

Collectively, vitamins assist in the formation of a wide spectrum of biochemicals including hormones, enzymes, proteins, neurotransmitters, and the genetic materials RNA and DNA. Soluble ascorbic acid is contained in the watery parts of fruits and vegetables and represents one of the least chemically stable molecules in the vitamin family.

Ascorbic acid is a weak acid, easily destroyed by mild alkali solutions such as baking soda. Once ingested, vitamin C is readily absorbed by the intestines and continues its journey through the watery components tissues that make up the human body, helping to build collagen protein while doubling as an antioxidant along the way.

In its natural state, ascorbic acid appears in the form of a white to yellowish crystal or powder. The chemical name ascorbic acid refers to L-ascorbic acid, the levorotatory isomer, and has been widely synthesized as a supplement or food additive.

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Vitamin C and Food

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

Q.
I’ve read it is preferred to not take vitamin C with food because it increases iron absorption and too much iron feeds cancerous cells.

Would taking Betaine HCl with enzymes also increases the absorption of iron?

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A.
Thank you for this question, you make good observations.
I take both vitamin C and Betaine HCl with pepsin daily.
Vitamin C is a very beneficial supplement. I take vitamin C on an empty stomach, 2 hours away from food.
Stomach acid (increased by Betaine HCL supplementation) is also very much needed, and is essential. It does increase the absorption of iron, but not having enough stomach acid means you’ll get too little iron and too little protein and not enough minerals.

Vitamin C Supplements

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

These are your choices with vitamin C:

  1. The typical Vitamin C (i.e. Ascorbic Acid)
  2. PureWay C (metabolic C)
  3. A Vitamin C-500 complex with Bioflavonoids (Now foods)
  4. Buffered vitamin C or  “Magnesium Ascorbate” (stomach friendly form of vit C) from Now Foods or Swanson vitamins:Vitamin C powder as Magnesium Ascorbate (not Ascorbic Acid)

    http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Magnesium-Ascorbate-8-oz-227-g/676?at=0&rcode=ZAG620

    “A super C source that’s gentle on the stomach! Swanson Buffered C features vitamin C that’s bonded to calcium through a special process that neutralizes the vitamin’s acidity, making it gentler on the stomach, even at high intakes.”

  5. Vitamin C (oil soluble form), Vitamin C (oil-soluble ascorbyl palmitate) http://www.vitacost.com/NSI-Ascorbyl-Palmitate

An idea: I have tried the first 3 and soon will be using the Magnesium Ascorbate (it is easier to absorb and has no negative effects on the GI)

If you want more vitamin C consider this idea: Take Vitamin C 1000 mg of buffered (magnesium ascorbate) 3 times/day  along with one oil-soluble C (ascorbyl palmitate) (3000mg/day total).

Vitamin C provides Superb free-radical protection

 

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Ending Inflammation

Friday, December 10th, 2010

What can I do about inflammation?

Inflammation could be caused by many factors, therein lies the challenge of knowing what is causing such inflammation. Fixing the problem at it’s root is much better than masking it.

Topically:

  • Emu oil (comment: I have not tried this)
  • copper peptides
  • ketoconazole can be used to topically partially inhibit cytokine formation.
  • Essential oils (comment: easy to apply)
  • Anything that kills scalp parasites can help reduce localized scalp inflammation
  • ACV (comment: good)
  • Kefir (comment: tried it, works but messy)
  • Xylitol (comment: I have not tried)

Diet:

Diet and nutrition:

  • Ecklonia Cava Extract (rich in phlorotannins/polyphenols with uniquely strong antioxidant properties)
  • Curcumin 95% (95% curcuminoids including curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which are antioxidants)
  • Krill Oil
  • R-Lipoic Acid (anti Oxidant)
  • Fish oil
  • DHEA
  • Stinging Nettle extract
  • GLA
  • Other antioxidants (vitamin E and N-acetyl cysteine)

Read the anti-inflammatory diets posted on this website. This website has a few anti inflammatory diets and diet recommendations. To find them visit:

You should consider finding food sensitivities that you have that might be sub-clinical. These could be causing chronic inflammation that you have grown accustomed to. The best way to find foods that don’t sit well with you is to go on the elimination diet then slowly reintroduce one food item at a time. You may enjoy the benefits of eliminating foods enough to not even care to re-introduce some items.

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Prof. Ayers Anti-Inflammatory Diet and Lifestyle

Friday, December 10th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is posted here for archival and educational purposes -::-

Components of an Anti-inflammatory Diet (focus on meats, fish, eggs and leafy vegetables)

  • Low starch and other simple sugars — insulin and high blood glucose are inflammatory; so use complex polysaccharides (not starch); starch only in small portions (1/2 banana or one side of a hamburger bun) and preferably in unprocessed, less available forms, e.g. coarse ground or fat coated — bread with butter; less than 30 gm in any meal, less is healthier, grains are frequently a problem — gluten intolerance
  • No high fructose corn syrup — high free fructose (in contrast to sucrose) is inflammatory and contributes to crosslinking of collagen fibers, which means prematurely aged skin; sucrose is much better than alternative sweeteners
  • High ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 fats — most vegetable oils (olive oil is the exception) are very high in omega-6 fats and are inflammatory and should be avoided; omega-3 fats from fish oil cannot have their full anti-inflammatory impact in the presence of vegetable oils; omega-3 supplements are needed to overcome existing inflammation — take with saturated fats
  • No trans fats — all are inflammatory
  • Probiotics and prebiotics — the bacteria in your gut are vitally important in reducing inflammation; most of the bacteria that initially colonize breastfed babies and are also present in fermented products seem to be helpful; formula quickly converts baby gut bacteria to inflammatory species and should be avoided completely for as long as possible to permit the baby’s immune system to mature (at least 6 months exclusive breastfeeding.)
  • Saturated fats are healthy and reduce the peroxidation of omega-3 fatty acids at sites of local  inflammation, e.g. fatty liver.  Saturated fats should be the major source of dietary calories.
  • Vegetable antioxidants — vegetables and fruits, along with coffee and chocolate supply very useful, anti-inflammatory anti-oxidants
  • Sensible daily supplements: 1,000 mg vitamin C; 2,000-5,000 i.u vitamin D3 (to produce serum levels of 60ng/ml); 750 mg glucosamine
  • Associated anti-inflammatory lifestyle components:
exercise (cardiovascular and muscle building),
minimizing body fat,
dental hygiene
vagal nerve stimulation

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