Archive for the ‘Causes’ Category

Trace elements content and hormonal profiles in women with androgenetic alopecia

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2010 Dec 15.
Trace elements content and hormonal profiles in women with androgenetic alopecia.
Skalnaya MG, Tkachev VP.

Russian Society of Trace Elements in Medicine, Zemlyanoy Val str., 46, Moscow 105064, Russia; ANO “Centre for Biotic Medicine”, Zemlyanoy Val str., 46, Moscow 105064, Russia.

It is well-known that some trace element imbalances play a significant role in the pathomechanism of many forms of alopecia. Androgenetic alopecia, however, is a specific local sensitivity of hair follicle receptors to androgens.

In a clinical and laboratory study, 153 women with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and 32 control women were examined. In AGA patients telogen hair and vellus hair (miniaturization, D<30μm) significantly differed in frontal and parietal hair comparison with occipital area (20±0.9% vs. 12±0.5% and 33±0.9% vs. 12±0.6% respectively).

In the AGA group levels of androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone were higher than in the control group. Hair elemental content, analyzed by ICP-MS, demonstrated a lowered Cu and Zn content in the frontal area in comparison to the occipital area. It is important to note, that the AGA patients with elevated levels of androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone presented an increased Cu content and decreased Mn, Se, Zn contents in the occipital area of scalp. The occipital level of Cu positively correlated with the concentration of free testosterone in the serum.

A negative correlation between the Zn content in the occipital area and the dehydroepiandrosterone level in the blood was found.

Unfortunately, a routine treatment course of AGA patients, including topical inhibitor of 5-alpha-reductase and minoxidil, had no effect on the Cu hair content in occipital and frontal areas.

However, there were positive changes in the morphological structure and other trace element contents. These data led us to hypothesize a key role of Cu metabolism disturbances in the AGA onset, development of AGA, and potential pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of AGA.

Causes of Female Pattern Hair Loss and Male Pattern Hair Loss (MPB)

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

This may be the most important question for you to ask. Once you know the cause you can work on a solution. Let’s get started:

It is clear that genetics and inheritance play a role in female and male pattern hair loss in creating a predisposition to hair loss or other related dysfunctions that coexist or cause hair loss. However, genetics are triggered and moderated by many factors, environmental, metabolic, dietary etc.. genetics alone do not offer an answer nor an understanding of why patterned hair loss occurs or how it can be reversed. Thanks to the polygenic nature of so called androgenic alopecia (AGA) we don’t fully understand how AGA happens within the androgen-dependent air loss model.

For now, male pattern baldness (MPB),  female pattern baldness is best defined as by visual means using a system such as the Hamilton-Norwood or Ludwig classification systems. The reality is that hair loss is caused by many factors, it is your body’s canary in a gold mine, alerting you to a larger issue within the body that needs to be addressed.

Most scientific research done regarding androgenic alopecia (AGA) concentrated on androgenic metabolism and androgenic receptors and the genes involved; however, as stated earlier many causes and models exist that may be worth investigating.  Some of these come from research into areas other than hair loss such as cardivascular and cancer research. Since hair loss incidents are linked to some of these diseases, preventing some of these degenerative diseases potentially does reverse hair loss.

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Naturally, the list below is a glimpse at a vast field.. oversimplified.

I have found many causes of hair loss, many of them overlap. Each of these will be explained in more detail individually as I get the time to write more.. The list below is enough to get you excited (I hope) and get you started on your research.

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The Patterned Baldness Multifactorial Model: Hormonal-Immune Interactions

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

During research into male pattern baldness, so called androgenic alopecia, I found an abstract of a study published in April of 1999 that talked about AGA and the “sensitivity to the male sex hormones” relating to the androgen metabolism model. This abstract went further and mentioned a lesser-known model referred to as the “multifactorial model”.

In this model, “hormones affect the hair follicle in a way that causes it to be perceived as a foreign body by the immune system, which then mounts an attack.” [15] This study suggests hormonal/immune interactions. The immune system is usually looked at in cases of Alopecia Areata but not AGA. The topic of Alopecia Areata is beyond the scope of this paper.

The author believes further research is needed to better determine the extent of hormonal/immune interactions on MPB.

The above was written on July 22, 2010

The Patterned Baldness Non Androgen-Dependent Model

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

More recently, on May of 2010, a study published by the Royal Hallamshire Hospital in the UK titled “Female pattern hair loss in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome” showed a puzzling finding, namely that women with complete insensitivity to androgens still exhibited AGA.

This is stated clearly in this quote: “We describe female pattern hair loss occurring in a patient with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome suggesting that mechanisms other than direct androgen action contribute to this common form of hair loss in women”. [30]

This study shows that other factors besides androgens and androgen metabolism maybe at play here.

The above was written on July 23, 2010

The Patterned Baldness Estrogen Metabolism Model

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

An abstract of a study published in October of 2006 titled “The hair follicle as an estrogen target and source” argues that estrogen also alters hair growth by binding to estrogen receptors (ER’s) and that estrogen alters androgen metabolism (AM) in the follicle. [25]

The study team, expressed their view aptly when the said: “that the time has come to pay estrogen-mediated signaling the full attention it deserves in future endocrinological therapy of common hair growth disorders.”

During the research for this paper, the author found a few references discussing the importance of the ratio between estrogen and androgen in AGA cases.

The above was written on July 23, 2010



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