Archive for the ‘Absorption / Digestion’ Category

Study: The impact of iron and selenium deficiencies on iodine and thyroid metabolism: biochemistry and relevance to public health.

Friday, July 1st, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Thyroid. 2002 Oct;12(10):867-78.

The impact of iron and selenium deficiencies on iodine and thyroid metabolism: biochemistry and relevance to public health.

Zimmermann MB, Köhrle J.

Laboratory for Human Nutrition, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland. Michael.zimmermann@ilw.agrt.ethz.ch
Abstract

Several minerals and trace elements are essential for normal thyroid hormone metabolism, e.g., iodine, iron, selenium, and zinc. Coexisting deficiencies of these elements can impair thyroid function.

Iron deficiency impairs thyroid hormone synthesis by reducing activity of heme-dependent thyroid peroxidase. Iron-deficiency anemia blunts and iron supplementation improves the efficacy of iodine supplementation.

Combined selenium and iodine deficiency leads to myxedematous cretinism. The normal thyroid gland retains high selenium concentrations even under conditions of inadequate selenium supply and expresses many of the known selenocysteine-containing proteins. Among these selenoproteins are the glutathione peroxidase, deiodinase, and thioredoxine reductase families of enzymes.

Adequate selenium nutrition supports efficient thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism and protects the thyroid gland from damage by excessive iodide exposure.

In regions of combined severe iodine and selenium deficiency, normalization of iodine supply is mandatory before initiation of selenium supplementation in order to prevent hypothyroidism.

(more…)

Vitamin C and Food

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

Q.
I’ve read it is preferred to not take vitamin C with food because it increases iron absorption and too much iron feeds cancerous cells.

Would taking Betaine HCl with enzymes also increases the absorption of iron?

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A.
Thank you for this question, you make good observations.
I take both vitamin C and Betaine HCl with pepsin daily.
Vitamin C is a very beneficial supplement. I take vitamin C on an empty stomach, 2 hours away from food.
Stomach acid (increased by Betaine HCL supplementation) is also very much needed, and is essential. It does increase the absorption of iron, but not having enough stomach acid means you’ll get too little iron and too little protein and not enough minerals.

Edgar Cayce’s Hair Loss Remedies – Pt. 2

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Please note, Cayce’s advice is not medical advice.. Do not apply crude oil on your scalp it contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.

It seems Glandular insufficiency and spinal lesions, according to the Cayce material, are by far the most common causes of hair loss (baldness).

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Here’s info that I found, was archived in 2009, the link is broken now, so here’s the text:

Quote:

BALDNESS
an Overview form the Cayce Health Database | edgarcayce.org Home Page

1. Physiological Considerations

Glandular insufficiency and spinal lesions (subluxations), according to the Cayce material, are by far the most common causes of hair loss (baldness) which may be accompanied by nail and even skin changes (abnormal pigmentation, vitiligo, etc.). Glandular dysfunction – usually the thyroid but the thymus and adrenals may also be involved may come about through the diet, i.e., insufficient amounts of necessary elements like calcium, or excesses of others like potassium. Other causes of glandular dysfunction include insufficient circulation, stress, infection, toxic chemicals (as found in cosmetics), general debilitation, etc.

The most commonly involved gland is the thyroid. It seems that when some elements necessary for proper thyroid functioning are missing, toxins which otherwise would have been eliminated are allowed to accumulate in the system. When this happens, inflammation, congestion, and circulatory disturbances occur, affecting the scalp and maybe the nails and skin. It is worth noting that the thyroid to some extent controls the circulation to the scalp, nails and skin, independent of the mechanism described above. When such disturbances occur, the outcome is hair loss with or without nail and skin changes, depending on the severity of the condition.

Impaired circulation from other causes may bring about the same effects without necessarily involving the thyroid or other glands, but is a much less common finding. The exception is spinal subluxation, being almost equally as frequent as glandular disturbance. It should be noted, though, that even when spinal subluxation is the primary condition, the glands often become involved as a result of impaired circulation through them (the thyroid especially). Hence in a large majority of cases the glands are either the primary or contributing cause of the condition.

In one or two instances, reference was made to prenatal tendencies as a contributory cause, but no definite information is available on this or on heredity.

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Edgar Cayce’s Hair Loss Remedies – Pt. 1 – Crude Oil, Castor Oil etc.

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

I have not tried the crude oil method.. But I was intrigued by the Edgar Cayce’s methods and regimen suggestions, that I compiled some of the info I have below. Please note, lots of the advice is in-line with other good advice that I came across and share here, however I would not use the crude oil topical, crude oil contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.  I am not sure why crude oil would work at all… if you know more on this please contact me.

Please note, Cayce’s advice is not medical advice.. Do not apply crude oil on your scalp it contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.

Quote:

 

“To his credit, Cayce recommended a healthy diet plus herbal and vitamin supplements to encourage hair growth. He also encouraged scalp massage to promote circulation. But his first rule of hair growth was to massage pure crude oil into the scalp. Cayce said that this treatment would ‘improve both the circulation of the scalp and the tone, luster and thickness of the hair.’

Following the crude oil application two or three times a month, Cayce recommended rinsing the hair with 20% grain alcohol to make the oil easier to wash out. The final step included rubbing Vaseline into the scalp to complete the hair rejuvenation process.

Cayce was careful to recommend only pure, unrefined crude oil ? no gasoline, kerosene or motor oil – and created his own brand that he named ?Crudoleum®.? Cayce?s Crudoleum® came from Pennsylvania and was said to have the mildest odor and the easiest texture to rinse out of hair. The reason, he said, is that Pennsylvania crude is paraffin-based. Darker oil is asphalt-based and, according to Cayce, more difficult to use.

The crude oil concept has since spawned an entire line of Crudoleum® hair products, including a hair rinse, hair conditioner and hair cream.

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What’s Wrong with Grains?

Friday, January 7th, 2011

There are issues with eating grains.
I’ve cut down on my consumption of grains.

One of these issues is Mycotoxins.

The other issue is phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors that are found in all grains, nuts and seeds.
Phytic acid combines with iron, calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc in the intestinal tract and thus interferes with the absorption of these substances. Enzyme inhibitors can interfere with digestion.

Heat does not neutralize phytic acid or enzyme inhibitors. For this reason, all grains, nuts and seeds should either be sprouted, soaked in an acidic medium (such as lemon juice or whey), fermented or sour-leavened in order to make them more digestible and nourishing. Many people who are allergic to grains can tolerate them when they are prepared in this way.

Corn is a little different–it must be soaked in a solution of water filtered through dolomite powder in order to free up its vitamin B3 content for human absorption.

Betaine HCl Supplements

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

These are two good Betaine HCL supplements:

1- NOW Foods Betaine HCl  120 Caps

iHerb: Now Foods, Betaine HCI, 648 mg, 120 Capsules

Swansons https://www.swansonvitamins.com/NWF286/ItemDetail?n=0

# Digestive Enzyme

# With 150 mg of Pepsin

# GMP Quality Assured

NOW Betaine Hydrochloride with Pepsin is formulated for maximum potency. It combines Betaine Hydrochloride (naturally occurring in beets) with Pepsin that is standardized to National Formulary requirements. This blend is encapsulated for quick delivery and is a great complement to any dietary regime. Contains no sugar, salt, starch, yeast, wheat, gluten, corn, soy, milk, egg, shellfish or preservatives.

2- Solaray High Potency HCL w/Pepsin 250 Caps

iHerb: Solaray, HCL with Pepsin, 650 mg, 250 Capsules

Swansons: https://www.swansonvitamins.com/SLR199/ItemDetail?n=0

Solaray HCl with Pepsin contains 650 mg of Betaine HCl and 162 mg of pepsin per capsule. Take one or more capsules during each meal. Do NOT take this product when your meal consists ONLY of salad or fruit.



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