Archive for the ‘Wheat’ Category

Gluten-Free and Wheat-Free Flours

Sunday, September 26th, 2010

Many are allergic to gluten and wheat. Some experience clear signs of their gluten intolerance or wheat allergy, many others experience much more subtle effects of such sensitivity.

It can be argued that our human digestive system did not evolve to to eat wheat and gluten as the paleolithic hu(wo)man ate mostly meats, fish, roots, berries, and seeds, not farmed grains.

It is also a fact that most of today’s flour has been stripped from it’s nutrients, bleached, grounded so fine to prolong shelf life (so even bugs can’t survive by eating that de-natured food) or to make using the flour easier, especially in the industries that want to create tasty and good looking pastries very fast. I will write other articles to talk about what to look for when buying wheat flour, I will also talk about the best method to prepare pastries using fermentation (not using baker’s wheat) in future articles.

For those of you that want to avoid wheat and gluten all together, I have good news. There are many alternatives, many are healthier than wheat.

I listed below “flours” that are alternatives to wheat flour and that are also gluten free. Remember, you’ll have to adjust any recipes you are using and maybe do some experimentation before you get the right quantities.
Amaranth flour: Amaranth flour is made from the seed of the Amaranth plant, which is a leafy vegetable. Alternative names: African spinach, Chinese spinach, Indian spinach, elephants ear.

Buckwheat flour: Buckwheat flour is not wheat, buckwheat is related to rhubarb. The small seeds of the plant are ground to make flour. Other  names: beech wheat, kasha, saracen corn.

Millet flour: Comes from the grass family.  Don’t use too much of this as millet has been shown to not be thyroid-friendly because it limits the uptake of iodine to the thyroid.

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Sourdough Article

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

One of my favorite articles on Sourdough bread is the one I pasted below. The author has graciously given this article to us free of copy rights.

Learn why Sourdough is the healthiest and only kind of bread to eat!

Article starts below:

Sourdough

Why Sourdough?

Commercial “baking” yeast is a single kind of organism that belches a lot of gas really fast and transforms grain into something that’s even less good for you. Sourdough is two organisms, wild yeast and bacteria, in symbiosis. Together they transform the grain to make it more healthful, more digestible, and also resistant to getting moldy or stale. Many people with wheat allergies or “yeast” allergies have no problem eating real sourdough. And it’s free!

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How Does It Work?

With sourdough, you are keeping and feeding a population of friendly yeast and bacteria, called a “culture”, or a “starter”. The population rises and falls, depending on where you keep it and what you feed it. When you make a loaf of bread, you are carefully managing a population explosion. The sour flavor comes from acids made by the yeast and bacteria, and when it gets really strong, that does not mean the sourdough is strongly active, but that it is depleted, that the population has already eaten its food and collapsed.

What You Need

Flour. Most grains will work, though only wheat has enough gluten to hold together big air bubbles and make a fluffy loaf. White flour does not have the right nutrients for the sourdough, or for you! I generally use organic whole wheat flour — bread flour for bread and pastry flour for everything else.

Water. The more filtered, the better. At the very least it needs the chlorine taken out, which you can do just by setting it in an open container for a day or so.

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Unsafe Gluten-Containing Foods / Ingredients List

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

I came across a very comprehensive list of foods or ingredients that contain gluten. This list is so well researched I am reposting here because I want to make sure this info is preserved. I take no credit for the information below.

Here’s the list:

Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
Alcohol (Spirits – Specific Types)
Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Atta Flour
Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
Barley Hordeum vulgare
Barley Malt
Beer (most contain barley or wheat)
Bleached Flour
Bran
Bread Flour
Brewer’s Yeast
Brown Flour
Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
Bulgur Wheat
Cereal Binding
Chilton
Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Cookie Crumbs
Cookie Dough
Cookie Dough Pieces
Couscous
Criped Rice
Dinkle (Spelt)
Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate
Durum wheat (Triticum durum)
Edible Coatings
Edible Films
Edible Starch
Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
Enriched Bleached Flour
Enriched Bleached Wheat Flour
Enriched Flour
Farina
Farina Graham
Farro
Filler
Flour (normally this is wheat)
Fu (dried wheat gluten)
Germ
Graham Flour
Granary Flour
Groats (barley, wheat)
Hard Wheat
Heeng
Hing
Hordeum Vulgare Extract
Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten
Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol
Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch
Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Kamut (Pasta wheat)
Kecap Manis (Soy Sauce)
Ketjap Manis (Soy Sauce)
Kluski Pasta
Maida (Indian wheat flour)
Malt
Malted Barley Flour
Malted Milk
Malt Extract
Malt Syrup
Malt Flavoring
Malt Vinegar
Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Matza
Matzah
Matzo
Matzo Semolina
Meringue
Meripro 711
Mir
Nishasta
Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
Orzo Pasta
Pasta

Pearl Barley
Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum)
Perungayam
Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)
Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)
Roux
Rusk
Rye
Seitan
Semolina
Semolina Triticum
Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Small Spelt
Spirits (Specific Types)
Spelt (Triticum spelta)
Sprouted Wheat or Barley
Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Strong Flour
Suet in Packets
Tabbouleh
Tabouli
Teriyaki Sauce
Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
Triticale X triticosecale
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
Udon (wheat noodles)
Unbleached Flour
Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Vital Wheat Gluten
Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
Wheat amino acids
Wheat Bran Extract
Wheat, Bulgur
Wheat Durum Triticum
Wheat Germ Extract
Wheat Germ Glycerides
Wheat Germ Oil
Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
Wheat Nuts
Wheat Protein
Wheat Triticum aestivum
Wheat Triticum Monococcum
Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
Whole-Meal Flour
Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)

The following items may or may not contain gluten depending on where and how they are made, and it is sometimes necessary to check with the manufacturer to find out:

Artificial Color4
Baking Powder4
Caramel Color1, 3
Caramel Flavoring1, 3
Clarifying Agents4
Coloring4
Dextrins1,7
Dextrimaltose1,7
Dry Roasted Nuts4
Emulsifiers4
enzymes4
Fat Replacer4
Flavoring6
Food Starch1, 4
Food Starch Modified1, 4
Glucose Syrup4
Gravy Cubes4
Ground Spices4
HPP4
HVP4
Hydrolyzed Plant Protein4
Hydrolyzed Protein4
Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein4

Hydrogenated Starch Hydrolysate4
Hydroxypropylated Starch4
Maltose4
Miso4
Mixed Tocopherols4
Modified Food Starch1, 4

Modified Starch1, 4
Natural Flavoring6
Natural Flavors6
Natural Juices4
Non-dairy Creamer4
Pregelatinized Starch4
Protein Hydrolysates4
Seafood Analogs4
Seasonings4
Sirimi4
Smoke Flavoring4
Soba Noodles4
Soy Sauce4
Soy Sauce Solids4
Sphingolipids4
Stabilizers4
Starch1, 4
Stock Cubes4
Suet4
Tocopherols4
Vegetable Broth4
Vegetable Gum4
Vegetable Protein4
Vegetable Starch4
Vitamins4
Wheat Starch5

  • 1) If this ingredient is made in North America it is likely to be gluten-free.
  • 3) The problem with caramel color is it may or may not contain gluten depending on how it is manufactured. In the USA caramel color must conform with the FDA standard of identity from 21CFR CH.1. This statute says: the color additive caramel is the dark-brown liquid or solid material resulting from the carefully controlled heat treatment of the following food-grade carbohydrates: Dextrose (corn sugar), invert sugar, lactose (milk sugar), malt syrup (usually from barley malt), molasses (from cane), starch hydrolysates and fractions thereof (can include wheat), sucrose (cane or beet). Also, acids, alkalis and salts are listed as additives which may be employed to assist the caramelization process.
  • 4) Can utilize a gluten-containing grain or by-product in the manufacturing process, or as an ingredient.
  • 5) Most celiac organizations in the USA and Canada do not believe that wheat starch is safe for celiacs. In Europe, however, Codex Alimentarius Quality wheat starch is considered acceptable in the celiac diet by most doctors and celiac organizations. This is a higher quality of wheat starch than is generally available in the USA or Canada.
  • 6) According to 21 C.F.R. S 101,22(a)(3): [t]he terns natural flavor or natural flavoring means the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof. Whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional.
  • 7) Dextrin is an incompletely hydrolyzed starch. It is prepared by dry heating corn, waxy maize, waxy milo, potato, arrowroot, WHEAT, rice, tapioca, or sago starches, or by dry heating the starches after: (1) Treatment with safe and suitable alkalis, acids, or pH control agents and (2) drying the acid or alkali treated starch. (1) Therefore, unless you know the source, you must avoid dextrin.

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Disclaimer: I must say this: The information presented herein is for informational purposes only. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements, making dietary changes, or before making any changes in prescribed medications.
All posts are strictly opinions meant to foster debate, education, comment, teaching, scholarship and research under the "fair use doctrine" in Section 107 of U.S. Code Title 17. No statement of fact is made and/or should be implied. Please verify all the articles on this site for yourself. The Information found here should in no way to be construed as medical advice. If You have a health issue please consult your professional medical provider. Everything here is the authors own personal opinion as reported by authors based on their personal perception and interpretation as a part of authors freedom of speech. Nothing reported here should be taken as medical advice, diagnosis or prescription; medical advice should only be taken from your health care provider. Consume the information found on this web site under your own responsibility. Please, do your own research; reach your own conclusions, and take personal responsibility and personal control of your health.