Archive for the ‘Scalp Massage’ Category

Study: Treatment of Male Pattern Baldness with Botulinum Toxin: A Pilot Study

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

Comment by Ethan:

This study is important because it reminds us that T conversion to DHT occurs in low oxygen environments, that the muscles (or anything) that constricts blood flow also reduces the availability of Oxygen in the scalp and dermal papilla.  Thus, relaxing these muscles, via botox (something I would not recommend since botox is a toxin), other approaches to relax the muscles and/or increase circulation and Oxygen levels include: various types of scalp massages, acupuncture, diet and nutrition, reducing inflammation, relaxation exercises etc is helpful to men with hair loss resulting from a genetic sensitivity to DHT.

 

 -:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Treatment of Male Pattern Baldness with Botulinum Toxin: A Pilot Study

Freund, Brian J. D.D.S., M.D.; Schwartz, Marvin D.D.S., M.Sc.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery . 126(5):246e-248e, November 2010.

doi: 10.1097/PRS.0b013e3181ef816d

Author Information

Crown Institute; Pickering, Ontario, Canada

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Edgar Cayce’s Hair Loss Remedies – Pt. 2

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Please note, Cayce’s advice is not medical advice.. Do not apply crude oil on your scalp it contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.

It seems Glandular insufficiency and spinal lesions, according to the Cayce material, are by far the most common causes of hair loss (baldness).

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Here’s info that I found, was archived in 2009, the link is broken now, so here’s the text:

Quote:

BALDNESS
an Overview form the Cayce Health Database | edgarcayce.org Home Page

1. Physiological Considerations

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Glandular insufficiency and spinal lesions (subluxations), according to the Cayce material, are by far the most common causes of hair loss (baldness) which may be accompanied by nail and even skin changes (abnormal pigmentation, vitiligo, etc.). Glandular dysfunction – usually the thyroid but the thymus and adrenals may also be involved may come about through the diet, i.e., insufficient amounts of necessary elements like calcium, or excesses of others like potassium. Other causes of glandular dysfunction include insufficient circulation, stress, infection, toxic chemicals (as found in cosmetics), general debilitation, etc.

The most commonly involved gland is the thyroid. It seems that when some elements necessary for proper thyroid functioning are missing, toxins which otherwise would have been eliminated are allowed to accumulate in the system. When this happens, inflammation, congestion, and circulatory disturbances occur, affecting the scalp and maybe the nails and skin. It is worth noting that the thyroid to some extent controls the circulation to the scalp, nails and skin, independent of the mechanism described above. When such disturbances occur, the outcome is hair loss with or without nail and skin changes, depending on the severity of the condition.

Impaired circulation from other causes may bring about the same effects without necessarily involving the thyroid or other glands, but is a much less common finding. The exception is spinal subluxation, being almost equally as frequent as glandular disturbance. It should be noted, though, that even when spinal subluxation is the primary condition, the glands often become involved as a result of impaired circulation through them (the thyroid especially). Hence in a large majority of cases the glands are either the primary or contributing cause of the condition.

In one or two instances, reference was made to prenatal tendencies as a contributory cause, but no definite information is available on this or on heredity.

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Edgar Cayce’s Hair Loss Remedies – Pt. 1 – Crude Oil, Castor Oil etc.

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

I have not tried the crude oil method.. But I was intrigued by the Edgar Cayce’s methods and regimen suggestions, that I compiled some of the info I have below. Please note, lots of the advice is in-line with other good advice that I came across and share here, however I would not use the crude oil topical, crude oil contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.  I am not sure why crude oil would work at all… if you know more on this please contact me.

Please note, Cayce’s advice is not medical advice.. Do not apply crude oil on your scalp it contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.

Quote:

 

“To his credit, Cayce recommended a healthy diet plus herbal and vitamin supplements to encourage hair growth. He also encouraged scalp massage to promote circulation. But his first rule of hair growth was to massage pure crude oil into the scalp. Cayce said that this treatment would ‘improve both the circulation of the scalp and the tone, luster and thickness of the hair.’

Following the crude oil application two or three times a month, Cayce recommended rinsing the hair with 20% grain alcohol to make the oil easier to wash out. The final step included rubbing Vaseline into the scalp to complete the hair rejuvenation process.

Cayce was careful to recommend only pure, unrefined crude oil ? no gasoline, kerosene or motor oil – and created his own brand that he named ?Crudoleum®.? Cayce?s Crudoleum® came from Pennsylvania and was said to have the mildest odor and the easiest texture to rinse out of hair. The reason, he said, is that Pennsylvania crude is paraffin-based. Darker oil is asphalt-based and, according to Cayce, more difficult to use.

The crude oil concept has since spawned an entire line of Crudoleum® hair products, including a hair rinse, hair conditioner and hair cream.

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Arch Dermatol. 1998 Nov;134(11):1349-52. “Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata”

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

Arch Dermatol. 1998 Nov;134(11):1349-52.
Randomized trial of aromatherapy. Successful treatment for alopecia areata.

Hay IC, Jamieson M, Ormerod AD.

Department of Dermatology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Foresterhill, Scotland. ad.ormerod@abdn.ac.uk

Comment in:

* Arch Dermatol. 1999 May;135(5):602-3.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of aromatherapy in the treatment of patients with alopecia areata.

DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of 7 months’ duration, with follow-up at 3 and 7 months.

SETTING: Dermatology outpatient department.

PARTICIPANTS: Eighty-six patients diagnosed as having alopecia areata.

INTERVENTION: Eighty-six patients were randomized into 2 groups. The active group massaged essential oils (thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood) in a mixture of carrier oils (jojoba and grapeseed) into their scalp daily. The control group used only carrier oils for their massage, also daily.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Treatment success was evaluated on sequential photographs by 2 dermatologists (I.C.H. and A.D.O.) independently. Similarly, the degree of improvement was measured by 2 methods: a 6-point scale and computerized analysis of traced areas of alopecia.

RESULTS: Nineteen (44%) of 43 patients in the active group showed improvement compared with 6 (15%) of 41 patients in the control group (P = .008). An alopecia scale was applied by blinded observers on sequential photographs and was shown to be reproducible with good interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.84). The degree of improvement on photographic assessment was significant (P = .05). Demographic analysis showed that the 2 groups were well matched for prognostic factors.

CONCLUSIONS: The results show aromatherapy to be a safe and effective treatment for alopecia areata. Treatment with these essential oils was significantly more effective than treatment with the carrier oil alone (P = .008 for the primary outcome measure). We also successfully applied an evidence-based method to an alternative therapy.

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