Pathophysiology. 2007 Dec;14(3-4):205-11. “Magnesium transport in hypertension”

Pathophysiology. 2007 Dec;14(3-4):205-11. Epub 2007 Oct 29.

Magnesium transport in hypertension.

Sontia B, Touyz RM.

Kidney Research Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Health Research Institute, 451 Smyth Rd, #2513, K1H 8M5 Ottawa, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence indicates an inverse association between Mg(2+) levels (serum and tissue) and blood pressure. Magnesium may influence blood pressure by modulating vascular tone and structure through its effects on numerous biochemical reactions that control vascular contraction/dilation, growth/apoptosis, differentiation and inflammation. Magnesium acts as a calcium channel antagonist, it stimulates production of vasodilator prostacyclins and nitric oxide and it alters vascular responses to vasoactive agonists. Mammalian cells regulate Mg(2+) concentration through specialized influx and efflux transport systems that have only recently been characterized. Magnesium efflux occurs via Na(2+)-dependent and Na(2+)-independent pathways. Mg(2+) influx is controlled by recently cloned transporters including Mrs2p, SLC41A1, SLC41A1, ACDP2, MagT1, TRPM6 and TRPM7. Alterations in some of these systems may contribute to hypomagnesemia and intracellular Mg(2+) deficiency in hypertension. In particular increased Mg(2+) efflux through altered regulation of the vascular Na(+)/Mg(2+) exchanger and decreased Mg(2+) influx due to defective vascular and renal TRPM6/7 expression/activity may be important. This review discusses the role of Mg(2+) in vascular biology and implications in hypertension and focuses on the putative transport systems that control vascular magnesium homeostasis. Much research is still needed to clarify the exact mechanisms of Mg(2+) regulation in the cardiovascular system and the implications of aberrant transcellular Mg(2+) transport in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

PMID: 18029156 [PubMed - in process]

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Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18029156?ordinalpos=29&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum






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