J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?”

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J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3.

Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?

Signorello LB, Wuu J, Hsieh C, Tzonou A, Trichopoulos D, Mantzoros CS.

Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Androgens are important in hair growth and patterning, whereas growth hormone substitution enhances their effect in growth hormone-deficient men. No previous study has jointly evaluated the function of sex steroids, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) in determining hair patterning in men.

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the relationship between circulating hormone measurements and both head and chest hair patterning in a sample of elderly men.

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METHODS: Fifty-one apparently healthy men older than 65 years of age were studied cross-sectionally. Head and chest hair patterning was assessed by a trained interviewer. Morning blood samples from all subjects were used for measurements of testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, SHBG, and IGF-1.

RESULTS: Results were obtained from logistic regression models, adjusting simultaneously for all the measured hormones and age. Men with higher levels of testosterone were more likely to have vertex baldness (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI: 0.9 to 7.8] per 194 ng/dL increment of testosterone). In addition, for each 59 ng/mL increase in IGF-1, the odds of having vertex baldness doubled (95% CI [1.0 to 4.6]). Those who were found to have higher circulating levels of SHBG were less likely to have dense hair on their chest (OR = 0.4, 95% CI [0.1 to 0.9] per 24 nmol/L increment in SHBG]).

CONCLUSION: Testosterone, SHBG, and IGF-1 may be important in determining hair patterning in men.

PMID: 10025745 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Source URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10025745






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One Response to “J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?””

  1. Chris Says:

    Is there a way to increase HGH or IGF-1 without causing hairloss, there are very many conflicting reports that IGF-1 is good and bad for hair, additionally I have heard of IGF-1 LR3, not sure of the difference but do you have any information on this.

    Thanks for your help

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