Posts Tagged ‘Alopecia Areata’

Study: Cure of alopecia areata after eradication of Helicobacter pylori: A new association?

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

 -:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Jul 14;17(26):3165-70.
Cure of alopecia areata after eradication of Helicobacter pylori: A new association?
Campuzano-Maya G.

Germán Campuzano-Maya, Faculty of Medicine, University of Antioquia. Medical Director, Laboratorio Clínico Hematológico, Carrera 43C No. 5-33, Medellín, Colombia.

Alopecia areata is a disease of the hair follicles, with strong evidence supporting autoimmune etiology. Alopecia areata is frequently associated with immune-mediated diseases with skin manifestations such as psoriasis and lichen planus, or without skin manifestations such as autoimmune thyroiditis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in around 50% of the world’s population and has been associated with a variety of immune-mediated extra-digestive disorders including autoimmune thyroiditis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and psoriasis. A case of a 43-year old man with an 8-mo history of alopecia areata of the scalp and beard is presented.

The patient was being treated by a dermatologist and had psychiatric support, without any improvement. He had a history of dyspepsia and the urea breath test confirmed H. pylori infection.

The patient went into remission from alopecia areata after H. pylori eradication. If such an association is confirmed by epidemiological studies designed for this purpose, new therapeutic options could be available for these patients, especially in areas where infection with H. pylori is highly prevalent.

Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21912461

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Study: Treatment effects of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection on alopecia areata

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Dermatol Surg. 2010 Dec;36 Suppl 4:2175-81. doi: 10.1111/j.1524-4725.2010.01709.x.
Treatment effects of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection on alopecia areata.
Cho HR, Lew BL, Lew H, Sim WY.
Source

Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, Kyunghee University, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

There are several different treatment options for alopecia areata (AA); Botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) can induce changes in neurotransmitter levels, directly or via neuroimmunologic mechanisms. Therefore it is thought that BTXA may influence cytokines that are responsible for hair growth arrest that characterizes AA.
OBJECTIVES:

To prospectively examine the safety and efficacy of BTXA injections for the treatment of patients with AA of the scalp.
METHODS AND MATERIALS:

Seven patients with AA received 10 U of BTXA intradermal injections on each site three times. Subjects were classified according to the extent of scalp hair loss into Severity of Alopecia Tool subclasses.
RESULTS:

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Two patients had one patch of AA; the remaining patients had total or universal type AA. One patient dropped out of the study after experiencing spontaneous recovery from her AA. One patient reported aggravation of her AA after BTXA injections. The remaining patients’ AA did not change after BTXA injections.
CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that BTXA injection cannot be used as an alternative treatment for recalcitrant AA. Nevertheless, future studies concerning the treatment efficacy of BTXA for mild to moderate AA are warranted.

© 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

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Types of Alopecia and Overlap in their Causes

Sunday, January 2nd, 2011

Alopecia can strike anyone for any variety of reasons.  Even newborn babies can be born with this condition.  There are five most common types of hair loss, several other types of alopecia exist, the first five being the most common ones:

  • The most common form of baldness is a progressive hair thinning condition, so called Androgenic alopecia or male pattern baldness (MPB).
  • Female pattern baldness. The equivalent of MPB, and often is related to Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS), malnutrition or wheat/gluten intolerance.
  • Alopecia areata, involves the loss of some of the hair from the head, Those with alopecia areata have scattered bald spots all over the head, or one large bald spot confined to one section of the head. It is known as “spot baldness”, it can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis). Alopecia areata, is typically associated with sudden hair loss, sometimes related to trauma, or illness, stress, abusive hair styling such as tight braids and pony tails, wigs, hairpieces or chemicals used on the hair. Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder. *4
  • Alopecia totalis, involves the loss of all of the head hair, typically be characterized by the complete loss of hair on the head.  The shedding of normal hair will usually occur over a certain amount of time. The sufferers of alopecia totalis will sometime have a small amount of soft Lanugo hair left over after the normal hair has completely fallen out. *7
  • Alopecia universalis, which involves the loss of all of the hair from the head and the body, from the top of the head to the legs and feet including eye brows.  Alopecia universalis is the rarest condition of the five most common forms of alopecia. It is thought that alopecial universalis is an autoimmune condition. *5

The following are are thought of as being less common, these can be confused as female/male pattern baldness:

Traction alopecia is most commonly found in people with ponytails or cornrows who pull on their hair with excessive force.

Trichotillomania is the loss of hair caused by compulsive pulling and bending of the hairs. It tends to occur more in children than in adults. In this condition the hairs are not absent from the scalp but are broken. Where they break near the scalp they cause typical, short, “exclamation mark” hairs.

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