Posts Tagged ‘Hair Loss Scale’

Study: Male Pattern Baldness: classification and Incidence – by NORWOOD, O’TAR T. MD

Sunday, September 18th, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Title:

Male Pattern Baldness: classification and Incidence NORWOOD, O’TAR T. MD – Southern Medical Journal

Abstract:

The need for a widely accepted, accurate, and reproducible standard of classification for male pattern baldness has increased with the advent and increasing popularity of hair transplant surgery. This report establishes such a classification, and reports its use in determining the incidence of male pattern baldness at various ages in 1,000 white adult male subjects. The action of testosterone as an incitant in male pattern baldness is well known, but this study points out the continued effect of time, even in later years. Since most hair transplant surgery is performed on subjects with male pattern baldness, and because the success of hair transplant surgery is largely dependent on proper patient selection, a complete understanding of male pattern baldness is essential for consistently good results with hair transplantation.

(C) 1975 Southern Medical Association

 

Find the attached document for the Norwood scalre and the full text of the Norwood study “Male Pattern Baldness: classification and Incidence” by Norwood. Click HERE

How is Patterned Baldness Tested for?

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

Evaluation for causative disorders should be done based on clinical symptoms. A mainstream physician wont do much if any testing once they’ve determined their patient has male-pattern and female-pattern hair loss. Many readily available blood, urine and saliva tests could be done to understand metabolic, hormonal and nutritional issues in the body. Other articles will discuss these further.

These are hair tests that could be done on the scalp/hair itself:

The pull test: to evaluate diffuse scalp hair loss. Gentle traction is exerted on a group of hair (about 40–60) on three different areas of the scalp. The number of extracted hairs is counted and examined under a microscope. Normally, <3 hairs per area should come out with each pull. If >10 hairs are obtained, the pull test is considered positive.

The pluck test: In this test, the individual pulls hair out “by the roots.” The root of the plucked hair is examined under a microscope to determine the phase of growth and used to diagnose a defect of telogen, anagen, or systemic disease. Telogen hairs are hairs that have tiny bulbs without sheaths at their roots. Telogen effluvium shows an increased percentage of hairs upon examination. Anagen hairs are hairs that have sheaths attached to their roots. Anagen effluvium shows a decrease in telogen-phase hairs and an increased number of broken hairs.

Hair mineral analysis: Tests for minerals and heavy metals.

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Scalp biopsy: This test is done when alopecia is present, but the diagnosis is unsure. The biopsy allows for differing between scarring and nonscarring forms. Hair samples are taken from areas of inflammation, usually around the border of the bald patch.

Daily Hair Counts: This is normally done when the pull test is negative. It is done by counting the number of hairs lost. The hair that should be counted are the hairs from the first morning combing or during washing. The hair is collected in a clear plastic bag for 14 days. The strands are recorded. If the hair count is >100/day is considered abnormal except after shampooing, where hair counts will be up 250 and be normal.

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Women’s Ludwig & Other Hair Loss Classification Scales

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

In women, the hair loss progresses as a diffused thinning of hair all over the top areas and crown of the head (i.e. parietal region). [5] [13] In this case, this hair loss is either referred to as male-pattern baldness, or as female-pattern baldness. [13]


Is Self Diagnosis of MPB Possible?

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

Can a man diagnose himself of having MPB?

Yes! In men, male pattern baldness (MPB) or Androgenic Alopecia (AGA) can be identified and defined visually. The use of the Hamilton Norwood Classification scale or other scales aids in this process and offers a more accurate classification.

Let me repeat: Self diagnosis for MPB is possible. I diagnosed myself, I then went to see the family doctor and asked him “what’s happening to my hair” he answered “male pattern baldness”. Don’t take my word for it, a study published in December, 2004 entitled “Validity of self reported male balding patterns in epidemiological studies” examined and compared the accuracy and reliability of the assessment of balding patterns when conducted by “trained observers” verses assessments of balding patterns conducted by “men” who are experiencing the balding themselves.

In this study, the trained observers and “men” used a classification system known as the “Hamilton-Norwood classification system” (shown below). This study found while it was best to have a trained observer assess the balding pattern, it found that “men’s self evaluation is accurate enough to ensure reliability and validity of results.” In other words, a man should be able to assess his own hair loss pattern using this scale reliably. [*1]

How to identify?

MPB causes a gradual thinning of the hair on the scalp, following a certain pattern. With MPB, the hair line either recedes uniformly from the forehead (this is known as frontal hair loss or frontal balding) or it recedes in a manner that follows an “M” shape (known as vertex hair loss). Vertex hair loss is also accompanied by hair loss at the crown or back of the head. [21] [23]

Both patterns could progress to partial baldness that leave hair around the sides of the head (resembling a “U” shape) or even to total baldness. The Hamilton Norwood scale is used by researchers and individuals to access or quantify their baldness pattern. [21] [23]

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Men’s Hamilton Norwood & Other Hair Loss Classification Scales

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

In men, male pattern baldness (MPB) or Androgenic Alopecia (AGA) can be identified and defined visually.

A study published in December, 2004 entitled “Validity of self reported male balding patterns in epidemiological studies” examined and compared the accuracy and reliability of the assessment of balding patterns when conducted by “trained observers” verses assessments of balding patterns conducted by “men” who are experiencing the balding themselves.

In this study, the trained observers and “men” used a classification system known as the “Hamilton-Norwood classification system” (shown below). This study found while it was best to have a trained observer assess the balding pattern, it found that “men’s self evaluation is accurate enough to ensure reliability and validity of results.” In other words, a man should be able to assess his own hair loss pattern using this scale reliably. [*1]

 

A related article posted today 9/18/2011 Male Pattern Baldness: classification and Incidence – by NORWOOD, O’TAR T. MD features a PDF document with the full text by Dr Norwood himself and his scale.

 

The Hamilton Norwood Classification Scale was created in 1975 and is shown next.


Figure 1. Hamilton Norwood Classification Scale (OT Norwood, 1975)

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