Posts Tagged ‘High Glycemic’

Got The Sugar Blues? Duffy Has Good News!

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

I recently completed reading a book titled Sugar Blues by William Duffy, I picked it up at a closeout sale at a Borders bookstore for half price. I like this one, learned a few things from it and have since recommended it to a few friends. I also have largely gone on a sugar-free experiment. I also recommend you read this book, it’s a classic diet book, yet it sounds as if it was written a couple years ago, there might be a few outdated bits and pieces but again, this is a classic worth reading and has a wealth of insight to offer you. I had reduced my sugar intake for a few years, seeking to be “moderate”, this book is actually helping me far “very easily” resist sugar. I am almost sugar free these days. I appreciate the history in this book, you will learn about the history of sugar, and other things like fermenting, sauerkraut and beer. You will learn how sugar was invented, and you will be reminded that unlike salt (so essential people used it as currency in the past) sugar is a relatively new addition to our diet. This book touched me in a positive way, and I feel it will do the same with you. You just might never look at food and eating the same way again! all good positive things!

Well, what else does the book talk about? Duffy makes it clear how he dislikes how sugar is labeled (or not labeled) on products and how it is inaccurate to lump refined sugar with other healthy carbs under the same label name. See, not all carbs are the same, but a food label doesn’t tell you that, nor does it say how much added sugar is in a product. You might be surprised to learn what I learned about brown and raw sugar products, and what they put sugar in (ketchup, mayo, dressing, etc), you’ll read about sugar and the persians, indians, crusades, and even slavery! The book is easy to read as well, well documented and sourced.

Knowing what I know now, it is difficult to allow myself to eat sugar, and I have this book to thank. This books acts as an anti-sugar vaccine or an anti-sugar booster shot. If you crave sugar simply read this book and you will no longer crave it!

Sugar is not a nutrient, it is not empty calories either, it is actually an anti-nutrient, when you eat it you are eating something that takes away vitamins from your body to rid itself of sugar.. thus Duffy defines it as a poison, and I see why.

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What Milk to Consume

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

This is a very common question, most would consider organic milk sold in stores as healthy milk. You should know that “organic milk” really means almost nothing special, it may mean there are no antibiotics or hormones in the milk but it does not mean the milk is good. Why? because it is heavily processed and it still comes from cows that did not eat grass and ones likely confined indoors.

Milk that has been pasteurized, homogenized, reinforced, heated, skimmed is simply adulterated milk that should be avoided. Adulterated milk (modern day every day milk) has been shown in studies to be linked to acne and hair loss. Milk, especially cow milk that has been adulterated causes scalp itching, inflammation and with continuous use could cause insulin resistance and a myriad of diseases related with that. Many people are lactose intolerant as well.

Raw milk from older breeds like the Jersey or the African (A2 cows) contain the amino acid proline in the beta-casein protein while in the younger breeds like the Holsteins (A1 cows) the proline amino acid has mutated and as a result causes many of the allergic reactions in people.

This is important because beta-casein also contains an amino acid called BCM-7, which is a powerful opiate linked to negative health effects. The proline that exists in A2 cows has a strong bond to BCM-7, which helps keep it out of the cows’ milk. The histidine in the newer A1 cows, however, has a weak hold on BCM-7, which allows it to get into the milk, and also into the people who drink the milk. The theory goes that by drinking milk from A1 cows, which are the predominant cows used for dairy products in the United States, you’re exposed to BCM-7 and BCM-7 has been linked to:

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  • Neurological impairment, including autistic and schizophrenic changes
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • An impaired immune response
  • Autoimmune disease
  • Heart disease…

Read more on this at “The Bovine – In response to Mercola’s Article on Raw Milk: http://thebovine.wordpress.com/2009/07/10/mercola-advocates-raw-milk-discusses-a1-a2-beta-casein-in-connection-with-autism-diabetes-heart-disease-etc/

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Glycemic Index, Insulin resistance and IGF-1

Monday, December 13th, 2010

There is a link between hair loss and Insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and IGF-1.

The studies below show that men with vertex balding had increased (higher) levels of circulating Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and decreased (lower) levels of circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP-3).

J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?”

evaluated the function of “sex steroids”, “sex hormone-binding globulin” (SHBG), and “insulin-like growth factor” (IGF-1) in determining hair-loss patterning in men. This study found that “for each 59 ng/mL increase in IGF-1, the odds of having vertex baldness doubled” and that “Testosterone, SHBG, and IGF-1 may be important in determining hair patterning in men.”

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000 Jun;42(6):1003-7. “Vertex balding, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3″ Found that  “Older men with vertex balding have lower circulating levels of IGFBP-3 and higher levels of IGF-1 when controlling for IGFBP-3 level.”

A link between IGF-1 and glucose intolerance / insulin resistance

Studies suggest that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) could be important determinants of glucose homoeostasis. The study below indicates that low IGF-1 levels are associated with the development of insulin resistance and provides “further evidence for the possible protective role of IGF-I against development of glucose intolerance.”

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Inflammation and Diet

Sunday, December 12th, 2010

Inflammation has been linked to hair loss and to diet. A diet that produces systemic inflammation is more likely to exist with hair loss than do anti-inflammatory diets.

Several inflammatory cytokines are induced by oxidant stress.  The fact that cytokines themselves trigger the release of other cytokines and also lead to increased oxidant stress makes them important in chronic inflammation. Toxic cytokines can be influenced by diet modifications.

Over production of pro-inflammatory hormone-like messengers (ex. prostaglandin E2 PGE2) and a lack of production of anti-inflammatory messengers (ex. prostaglandin E1 and E3) is a common cause of inflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids seem to suppress the production of PGE2 and promote the production of the beneficial prostaglandin PGE3. Thus the recommendation is to reduce foods that are high in omega-6 fatty acids and increase the intake of foods high in omega-3. This will lead to more of the beneficial prostaglandins (E1 and E3) and less of the PGE2 linked to inflammation.

Also, Gamma linolinic acid (GLA) induces the production of the anti-inflammatory PGE1.

Arachidonic acid is a precursor to both the pro-inflammatory prostanglandin E2 (PGE2) and the pro-inflammatory cytokine leukotriene B4. Limiting foods that lead to the synthesis of arachidonic acid can also help reduce inflammation.

A high-glycemic index (GI) diet cause excess production of insulin often leading to sharper spikes in insulin. Consuming GI foods could lead to the production of arachidonic acid. So, naturally one should avoid all high GI foods.

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Free-IGF-1 lowers SHBG | Acne, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Hyperinsulinemia and Diet

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

1)

Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1584-90.
Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization.

Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J.
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. cordain@cahs.colostate.edu
Comment in:
* Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1591-2.
* Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):941; author reply 942-3.
* Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):941-2; author reply 942-3.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In westernized societies, acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79% to 95% of the adolescent population. In men and women older than 25 years, 40% to 54% have some degree of facial acne, and clinical facial acne persists into middle age in 12% of women and 3% of men. Epidemiological evidence suggests that acne incidence rates are considerably lower in nonwesternized societies. Herein we report the prevalence of acne in 2 nonwesternized populations: the Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and the Aché hunter-gatherers of Paraguay. Additionally, we analyze how elements in nonwesternized environments may influence the development of acne.

OBSERVATIONS: Of 1200 Kitavan subjects examined (including 300 aged 15-25 years), no case of acne (grade 1 with multiple comedones or grades 2-4) was observed. Of 115 Aché subjects examined (including 15 aged 15-25 years) over 843 days, no case of active acne (grades 1-4) was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: The astonishing difference in acne incidence rates between nonwesternized and fully modernized societies cannot be solely attributed to genetic differences among populations but likely results from differing environmental factors. Identification of these factors may be useful in the treatment of acne in Western populations.

PMID: 12472346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Insulin Resistance Disorders and Androgenetic Alopecia

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

 

There is a link between hair loss (balding) and high insulin levels in blood.  Multiple studies have shown that men who experience early balding (i.e under the age of 35) tend to have high blood insulin levels. There is a strong prevalence of insulin resistance with androgenetic alopecia (AGA), and more troublesome, there’s an association of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with insulin-resistance-related disorders such as ischemic heart disease and serious cardiovascular events.

The above is not only true in men. An association between AGA and anthropometric abnormalities (linked with insulin resistance and heredity) was found in women aged 63 years. Female AGA has usually been linked with hyper-androgenism and hirsutism and, most recently, also with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Polycystic ovarian syndrome is quite common among Caucasian women, and its association with insulin resistance is well documented.

Further, epidemiological studies have associated androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with severe young-age coronary artery disease and hypertension, and linked it to insulin resistance

The following studies show that AGA and high blood insulin levels are connected. The first dated Sept 2000, then June 2003, June 2006, and Oct 2009.

Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6 “Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance” Found that men under the age of 35 with an early onset of alopecia aged showed a “strikingly increased risk of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin-resistance-associated disorders” (i.e obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). That early androgenetic alopecia could be a clinical marker of insulin resistance.

J Cardiovasc Risk. 2003 Jun;10(3):227-31. “Hair loss, insulin resistance, and heredity in middle-aged women…” Found that female with some markers of insulin resistance have significantly increased risk for female AGA. Paternal history of alopecia seemed to be more common in female AGA compared to women with normal or minimal loss of hair.

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