Posts Tagged ‘Hypertension’

Got The Sugar Blues? Duffy Has Good News!

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

I recently completed reading a book titled Sugar Blues by William Duffy, I picked it up at a closeout sale at a Borders bookstore for half price. I like this one, learned a few things from it and have since recommended it to a few friends. I also have largely gone on a sugar-free experiment. I also recommend you read this book, it’s a classic diet book, yet it sounds as if it was written a couple years ago, there might be a few outdated bits and pieces but again, this is a classic worth reading and has a wealth of insight to offer you. I had reduced my sugar intake for a few years, seeking to be “moderate”, this book is actually helping me far “very easily” resist sugar. I am almost sugar free these days. I appreciate the history in this book, you will learn about the history of sugar, and other things like fermenting, sauerkraut and beer. You will learn how sugar was invented, and you will be reminded that unlike salt (so essential people used it as currency in the past) sugar is a relatively new addition to our diet. This book touched me in a positive way, and I feel it will do the same with you. You just might never look at food and eating the same way again! all good positive things!

Well, what else does the book talk about? Duffy makes it clear how he dislikes how sugar is labeled (or not labeled) on products and how it is inaccurate to lump refined sugar with other healthy carbs under the same label name. See, not all carbs are the same, but a food label doesn’t tell you that, nor does it say how much added sugar is in a product. You might be surprised to learn what I learned about brown and raw sugar products, and what they put sugar in (ketchup, mayo, dressing, etc), you’ll read about sugar and the persians, indians, crusades, and even slavery! The book is easy to read as well, well documented and sourced.

Knowing what I know now, it is difficult to allow myself to eat sugar, and I have this book to thank. This books acts as an anti-sugar vaccine or an anti-sugar booster shot. If you crave sugar simply read this book and you will no longer crave it!

Sugar is not a nutrient, it is not empty calories either, it is actually an anti-nutrient, when you eat it you are eating something that takes away vitamins from your body to rid itself of sugar.. thus Duffy defines it as a poison, and I see why.

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TCM, Sexual Activity and Hair Loss

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Sexual activity:

In TCM texts and in ancient Taoist teachings state that a healthy head of hair in a man is indicative of a high level of sexual energy. To obtain such high level of sexual energy through “excessive emissions” a man’s health will suffer leading to hair loss and premature aging. Similar ancient Indian teachings, the Taoists created exercises and teachings to cultivate one’s sexual energy, increase and tame libido and as a result slow the aging process.

If you want to learn this, I suggest these books:

Taoist Secrets of Love: Cultivating Male Sexual Energy [Paperback]
Mantak Chia (Author), Michael Winn (Author)
# ISBN-10: 0943358191
# ISBN-13: 978-0943358192
Publisher: Aurora Press (June 1984)

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Healing Love through the Tao: Cultivating Female Sexual Energy [Paperback]
Mantak Chia (Author), Maneewan Chia (Author
# ISBN-10: 1594770689
# ISBN-13: 978-1594770685
# Publisher: Destiny Books (July 26, 2005)

The Multi-Orgasmic Couple: Sexual Secrets Every Couple Should Know [Paperback]
Mantak Chia (Author), Maneewan Chia (Author), Douglas Abrams (Author), Rachel Carlton Abrams (Author)
# ISBN-10: 0062516140
# ISBN-13: 978-0062516145
# Publisher: HarperOne (January 8, 2002)

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Glycemic Index, Insulin resistance and IGF-1

Monday, December 13th, 2010

There is a link between hair loss and Insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and IGF-1.

The studies below show that men with vertex balding had increased (higher) levels of circulating Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and decreased (lower) levels of circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP-3).

J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?”

evaluated the function of “sex steroids”, “sex hormone-binding globulin” (SHBG), and “insulin-like growth factor” (IGF-1) in determining hair-loss patterning in men. This study found that “for each 59 ng/mL increase in IGF-1, the odds of having vertex baldness doubled” and that “Testosterone, SHBG, and IGF-1 may be important in determining hair patterning in men.”

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000 Jun;42(6):1003-7. “Vertex balding, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3″ Found that  “Older men with vertex balding have lower circulating levels of IGFBP-3 and higher levels of IGF-1 when controlling for IGFBP-3 level.”

A link between IGF-1 and glucose intolerance / insulin resistance

Studies suggest that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) could be important determinants of glucose homoeostasis. The study below indicates that low IGF-1 levels are associated with the development of insulin resistance and provides “further evidence for the possible protective role of IGF-I against development of glucose intolerance.”

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Grounding or Earthing and Holistic Health

Thursday, December 9th, 2010

GroundingHow I learned of grounding:

I always had a connection (felt connected) to nature and our planet, once this connection was compromised I experienced dis-ease. I know this from personal experience.

In my quest to reverse my male pattern baldness, improve my vision and heal decaying teeth I researched many diets and theories, trying to figure out what the right thing to eat was, more accurately what my body evolved to eat.

I learned of great concepts such as paleolithic dieting and metabolic typing. Dr. Weston Price, like many others, also figured it was all in the diet, that natives and uncivilized people had great teeth (and hair) due to their diet.

One morning as I continued to research the correct genetic type of foods for me, I had a very simple idea sprout from my mind and catch my attention, “it’s not all in the diet”. While diet is a major factor of the body’s health, I believe looking at diets, supplements and chemicals only for an answer misses 1/2 the reality.

Yes the paleolithic humans ate differently, yes the uncivilized white-teethed tribes ate differently. Some ate raw foods, some ate a vegetarian diet of roots and fruits, some drank raw milk, others ate mostly sea food or meat. Finding commonalities in these diets has been the obsession of many researchers and remains an interest of mine; the same with metabolic typing. One convincing answer that explains why different diets had similar results in natives is that these people ate what was right for their metabolic type.

Keeping that in mind, I sifted through facts and theories on ancient and uncivilized diets, then I noticed something that was even more in common between these ancient people, besides how different their diets were than the typical SAD (Standard American Diet). they all were barefoot (or used thin leather sandals), sat on rocks or the ground, climbed trees, swam, and got a lot of sunshine. These people were more “grounded” than us today. I cannot comment on their spirituality, life habits, culture, mind-set, or rituals but I know they were grounded, got a lot of sun and plenty of functional physical activity.

I theorize that it was not just the diet that made our ancestors healthy, it also must have been their lifestyle: especially grounding activities, functional paleo-type physical activity, and plenty of sunshine. This is not to discount diet, diet is a huge part of health, but not the answer-to-all solution to a holistic whole health.

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140+ Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

The following list was written by Nancy Appleton, Ph.D. (visit her very informative website www.nancyappleton.com), the author of the book Lick The Sugar Habit.

In addition to throwing off the body’s homeostasis, excess sugar may result in a number of other significant consequences. The following is a listing of some of sugar’s metabolic consequences from a variety of medical journals and other scientific publications.

141 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health

(Just Kidding, it’s 143)

By Nancy Appleton PhD & G.N. Jacobs

Excerpted from Suicide by Sugar

Used with permission

1. Sugar can suppress your immune system.

2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.

3. Sugar can cause juvenile delinquency in children.

4. Sugar eaten during pregnancy and lactation can influence muscle force production in offspring, which can affect an individual’s ability to exercise.

5. Sugar in soda, when consumed by children, results in the children drinking less milk.

6. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses and return them to fasting levels slower in oral contraceptive users.

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Insulin Resistance Disorders and Androgenetic Alopecia

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

 

There is a link between hair loss (balding) and high insulin levels in blood.  Multiple studies have shown that men who experience early balding (i.e under the age of 35) tend to have high blood insulin levels. There is a strong prevalence of insulin resistance with androgenetic alopecia (AGA), and more troublesome, there’s an association of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with insulin-resistance-related disorders such as ischemic heart disease and serious cardiovascular events.

The above is not only true in men. An association between AGA and anthropometric abnormalities (linked with insulin resistance and heredity) was found in women aged 63 years. Female AGA has usually been linked with hyper-androgenism and hirsutism and, most recently, also with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Polycystic ovarian syndrome is quite common among Caucasian women, and its association with insulin resistance is well documented.

Further, epidemiological studies have associated androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with severe young-age coronary artery disease and hypertension, and linked it to insulin resistance

The following studies show that AGA and high blood insulin levels are connected. The first dated Sept 2000, then June 2003, June 2006, and Oct 2009.

Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6 “Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance” Found that men under the age of 35 with an early onset of alopecia aged showed a “strikingly increased risk of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin-resistance-associated disorders” (i.e obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). That early androgenetic alopecia could be a clinical marker of insulin resistance.

J Cardiovasc Risk. 2003 Jun;10(3):227-31. “Hair loss, insulin resistance, and heredity in middle-aged women…” Found that female with some markers of insulin resistance have significantly increased risk for female AGA. Paternal history of alopecia seemed to be more common in female AGA compared to women with normal or minimal loss of hair.

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Insulin Resistance Article – Archived

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-
Thanks to medscape.com for this invaluable article

Insulin Resistance

Background

Insulin resistance is a state in which a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. Insulin resistance has also been arbitrarily defined as the requirement of 200 or more units of insulin per day to attain glycemic control and to prevent ketosis.

The syndromes of insulin resistance actually make up a broad clinical spectrum, which includes obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome, as well as an extreme insulin-resistant state. Many of these disorders are associated with various endocrine, metabolic, and genetic conditions. These syndromes may also be associated with immunological diseases and may exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics.

The metabolic syndrome —a state of insulin-resistance that is also known as either syndrome X or the dysmetabolic syndrome—has drawn the greatest attention because of its public health importance.

In an effort to clinically identify patients with insulin resistance, various organizations have developed diagnostic criteria. The most commonly used criteria in the United States are those of the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III).

  • NCEP/ATP III criteria for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome include the following (diagnosis is made when 3 or more are present):
    • Waist circumference of more than 102 cm in men or more than 88 cm in women
    • Fasting triglyceride level of 150 mg/dL or higher
    • Blood pressure level of 130/85 mm Hg or higher
    • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level of less than 40 mg/dL in men or less than 50 mg/dL in women
    • Fasting glucose level of 110 mg/dL or higher (which has been changed to 100 mg/dL to reflect revised criteria for impaired fasting glucose [IFG])

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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Oct;71(4):494-9. “Androgenetic alopecia and insulin resistance in young men”

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Oct;71(4):494-9.

Androgenetic alopecia and insulin resistance in young men.

González-González JG, Mancillas-Adame LG, Fernández-Reyes M, Gómez-Flores M, Lavalle-González FJ, Ocampo-Candiani J, Villarreal-Pérez JZ.

Servicio de Endocrinologia, Dr Jose Eleuterio Gonzalez University Hospital, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Ave. Madero y Gonzalitos S/N, Monterrey, Mexico. jgonzalezg@fm.uanl.mx

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have associated androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with severe young-age coronary artery disease and hypertension, and linked it to insulin resistance. We carried out a case-control study in age- and weight-matched young males to study the link between AGA and insulin resistance using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index or metabolic syndrome clinical manifestations.

METHODS: Eighty young males, 18-35 years old, with AGA > or = stage III in the Hamilton-Norwood classification, and 80 weight- and age-matched controls were included. Alopecia, glucose, serum insulin, HOMA-IR index, lipid profile and androgen levels, as well as metabolic syndrome criteria, were evaluated.

RESULTS: The HOMA-IR index was significantly higher in cases than controls. Nonobese cases had a higher mean diastolic blood pressure and a more frequent family history of AGA than nonobese controls. A borderline difference in the HOMA-IR index was found in obese AGA cases vs. obese controls [P = 0.055, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.36-4.20 vs. 1.75-2.73]. Free testosterone values were significantly higher in controls than cases, regardless of body mass index (BMI). A statistically significant additive effect for obesity plus alopecia was found, with significant trends for insulin, the HOMA-IR index, lipids and free testosterone when BMI and alopecia status were used to classify the participants.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the recommendation for assessing insulin resistance and cardiovascular-related features and disorders in all young males with stage III or higher AGA, according to the Hamilton-Norwood classification.

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Cent Eur J Public Health. 2006 Jun;14(2):78-81. “Association of insulin resistance linked diseases and hair loss in elderly men. Finnish population-based study”

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010

Note: The below is published here for archival purposes.

Cent Eur J Public Health. 2006 Jun;14(2):78-81.

Association of insulin resistance linked diseases and hair loss in elderly men. Finnish population-based study.

Hirsso P, Laakso M, Matilainen V, Hiltunen L, Rajala U, Jokelainen J, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S.

University of Oulu, Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, Finland. paivi.hirsso@oulu.fi

Abstract

Previous investigations have shown an association of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with insulin resistance related disorders such as ischemic heart disease. An association between AGA and anthropometric abnormalities linked with insulin resistance and heredity in women aged 63 years has also been shown.

We therefore compared 63-year-old men with AGA and ones with normal hair status for insulin resistance linked parameters. A population of 245 men aged 63 years, who were participants in a population-based cross-sectional study in the City of Oulu, underwent a medical check-up including assessment of hair status on the Hamilton-Norwood scale and determination of anthropometric measures, blood pressure, fasting glucose and serum lipids.

Fifty eight per cent of the men reported extensive hair loss (grade III-VII). Hypertension and the use of antihypertensive drugs were common among men with AGA (61% vs. 45% and 50% vs. 26%, respectively). The rates of diabetes and hyperinsulinemia (21% vs. 12% and 61% vs. 49%) were higher among men with AGA compared to those with normal hair status but no difference was seen in other factors.

Our findings show that AGA is common among Finnish men aged 63 years but that it is also associated with insulin linked disturbances, such as hypertension and diabetes. Such men developing AGA might benefit from attention in medical check-up.

PMID: 16830609 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6 “Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance”

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6.

Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance.

Matilainen V, Koskela P, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S.

Abstract

The previously proven association between androgenetic, alopecia and serious cardiovascular events raises a question of the common pathogenetic mechanism of these disorders. Our practice-based case-control study in men aged 19-50 years showed a strikingly increased risk of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin-resistance-associated disorders such as obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in men with early onset of alopecia (<35), compared with age-matched controls.

This finding supports the hypothesis that early androgenetic alopecia could be a clinical marker of insulin resistance.

PMID: 11030300 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

LinkOut – more resources (more…)



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