Posts Tagged ‘Insulin’

It’s About Insulin Control

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Insulin has been dubbed the “hormone of death” by Life Extension Foundation.

Insulin/IGF signaling itself may mediate communication among various tissues to influence organismal longevity.

Not fat, neither calorie restriction per se, insulin is what matters when it comes to longevity.

Reduction of fat mass without caloric restriction can be associated with increased longevity in mice, possibly through effects on insulin signaling. In the Insulin Levels and Life Span Studies article below, you will see a study titled “Extended Longevity in Mice Lacking the Insulin Receptor in Adipose Tissue”, the genetically altered mice (with fat cells unresponsive to insulin) ate all they wanted (55 percent more food than the control mice) and remained thin, they had 70 percent less body fat than the control group.

The genetically altered mice lived 18 percent longer than the control mice.

I found two main camps, one in favor of fat restriction the other calorie restriction. What is at play in my opinion is insulin. When calorie restriction helps with life extension it is actually the insulin control that is increasing longevity.

Insulin release is stimulated in response to grain, starch and sugar consumption.

I’ve posted various articles here on the harmful effects of sugar you might want to check out.

These are other articles relating to insulin: (more…)

Insulin Levels and Life Span Studies

Tuesday, December 14th, 2010

Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 4 August 2004
Vol. 2004, Issue 31, p. re5
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2004.31.re5]

REVIEWS

Murine Models of Life Span Extension

Jason K. Quarrie, and Karl T. Riabowol

The authors are in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N1. E-mail: karl@ucalgary.ca (K.T.R.)

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2004/31/re5

Key Words: life span extension • mouse models • growth hormone • insulin-like growth factor • oxidative damage • caloric restriction

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Abstract: Mice are excellent experimental models for genetic research and are being used to investigate the genetic component of organismal aging. Several mutant mice are known to possess defects in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) neurohormonal pathway and exhibit dwarfism together with extended life span. Their phenotypes resemble those of mice subjected to caloric restriction. Targeted mutations that affect components of this pathway, including the GH receptor, p66Shc, and the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), also extend life span; mutations that affect IGF-1R or downstream components of the pathway decouple longevity effects from dwarfism. These effects on life span may result from an increased capacity to resist oxidative damage.

Citation: J. K. Quarrie, K. T. Riabowol, Murine Models of Life Span Extension. Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2004 (31), re5 (2004)

source: http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/2004/31/re5

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Insulin Resistance Disorders and Androgenetic Alopecia

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

 

There is a link between hair loss (balding) and high insulin levels in blood.  Multiple studies have shown that men who experience early balding (i.e under the age of 35) tend to have high blood insulin levels. There is a strong prevalence of insulin resistance with androgenetic alopecia (AGA), and more troublesome, there’s an association of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with insulin-resistance-related disorders such as ischemic heart disease and serious cardiovascular events.

The above is not only true in men. An association between AGA and anthropometric abnormalities (linked with insulin resistance and heredity) was found in women aged 63 years. Female AGA has usually been linked with hyper-androgenism and hirsutism and, most recently, also with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Polycystic ovarian syndrome is quite common among Caucasian women, and its association with insulin resistance is well documented.

Further, epidemiological studies have associated androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with severe young-age coronary artery disease and hypertension, and linked it to insulin resistance

The following studies show that AGA and high blood insulin levels are connected. The first dated Sept 2000, then June 2003, June 2006, and Oct 2009.

Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6 “Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance” Found that men under the age of 35 with an early onset of alopecia aged showed a “strikingly increased risk of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin-resistance-associated disorders” (i.e obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). That early androgenetic alopecia could be a clinical marker of insulin resistance.

J Cardiovasc Risk. 2003 Jun;10(3):227-31. “Hair loss, insulin resistance, and heredity in middle-aged women…” Found that female with some markers of insulin resistance have significantly increased risk for female AGA. Paternal history of alopecia seemed to be more common in female AGA compared to women with normal or minimal loss of hair.

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