Posts Tagged ‘Iodine’

Personal Log – Nov 24, 2012

Saturday, November 24th, 2012

This blog is on Iodine.

Over the last year I’ve gone on and off iodine; the same outcome/experiences repeated. This is what it was like:

If I take anything more than one drop a day I get very clear symptoms. The symptoms include throat pain, headaches, even joint pain and upper back muscle pain, and neck pain which causes more headaches. It feels a lot like the flu. The most annoying symptom is the headaches and muscle pains, and sometimes bad breath, or a sorta metallic smell that only you can smell as if it’s your skin but really no one else can smell it.  The symptoms can last any where from 2 days to 1 week.  This is more likely to happen if one doesnt drink enough water or take vitamin C.   However, before theses symptoms set in, I experience more energy than usual, enough to keep me up at night and not feel tired the next day. This lasts for about 2 days then the detox symptoms start.  If I take mega doses of vitamin C the symptoms are reduced or can be eliminated. However the best way to take iodine is slowly and carefully.

The best way to take iodine is very slowly, I mean to take one drop every other day for a week, then one drop a day for 1-2 weeks, then go to 2 drops daily. When symptoms show up (you know you went too fast) stop the iodine and take vitamin C then start over. You can build your tolerance this way.

Three years ago I was taking 4 or 5 drops a day with no symptoms. I also was feeling healthier and my weight was much better than it was when I wasn’t taking iodine.

All the above was referring to the TPCS Iosol iodine, not other brands which I also have used. Other iodine brands did not/do not have the same clear symptoms (side effect, or detox effects). I’ve taken a multitude of different iodine supplements such as J Crow lugols 2%,  Optimox Iodoral, EuroPharma Terry Naturally Tri-Iodine, Life-Flo Liquid Iodine Plus, and Marine Bio Therapies Liquid Potassium Iodide, and I can take much more in amount/quantity with lesser symptoms than when I take Iosol Formula II.

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Study: The impact of common micronutrient deficiencies on iodine and thyroid metabolism: the evidence from human studies.

Thursday, September 22nd, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Feb;24(1):117-32.
The impact of common micronutrient deficiencies on iodine and thyroid metabolism: the evidence from human studies.
Hess SY.

Program in International and Community Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. syhess@ucdavis.edu
Abstract

Deficiencies of micronutrients are highly prevalent in low-income countries. Inadequate intake of iodine impairs thyroid function and results in a spectrum of disorders. Other common deficiencies of micronutrients such as iron, selenium, vitamin A, and possibly zinc may interact with iodine nutrition and thyroid function. Randomised controlled intervention trials in iodine- and iron-deficient populations have shown that providing iron along with iodine results in greater improvements in thyroid function and volume than providing iodine alone. Vitamin A supplementation given alone or in combination with iodised salt can have a beneficial impact on thyroid function and thyroid size. Despite numerous studies of the effect of selenium on iodine and thyroid metabolism in animals, most published randomised controlled intervention trials in human populations failed to confirm an impact of selenium supplementation on thyroid metabolism. Little evidence is available on interactions between iodine and zinc metabolism.

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Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20172476
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
From http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20172476

Selenium and the control of thyroid hormone metabolism.

Friday, July 1st, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Thyroid. 2005 Aug;15(8):841-53.
Selenium and the control of thyroid hormone metabolism.
Köhrle J.

Institut für Experimentelle Endokrinologie und Endokrinologisches Forschungs-Centrum der Charité EnForCé, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. josef.koehrle@charite.de

Abstract

Thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism and action require adequate availability of the essential trace elements iodine and selenium, which affect homeostasis of thyroid hormone-dependent metabolic pathways.

The three selenocysteine-containing iodothyronine deiodinases constitute a novel gene family. Selenium is retained and deiodinase expression is maintained at almost normal levels in the thyroid gland, the brain and several other endocrine tissues during selenium deficiency, thus guaranteeing adequate local and systemic levels of the active thyroid hormone T(3).

Due to their low tissue concentrations and their mRNA SECIS elements deiodinases rank high in the cellular and tissue-specific hierarchy of selenium distribution among various selenoproteins.

While systemic selenium status and expression of abundant selenoproteins (glutathione peroxidase or selenoprotein P) is already impaired in patients with cancer, disturbed gastrointestinal resorption, unbalanced nutrition or patients requiring intensive care treatment, selenium-dependent deiodinase function might still be adequate.

However, disease-associated alterations in proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, hormones and pharmaceuticals modulate deiodinase isoenzyme expression independent from altered selenium status and might thus pretend causal relationships between systemic selenium status and altered thyroid hormone metabolism.

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Study: Effects of combined iodine and selenium deficiency on thyroid hormone metabolism in rats

Friday, July 1st, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Feb;57(2 Suppl):240S-243S.

Effects of combined iodine and selenium deficiency on thyroid hormone metabolism in rats.

Beckett GJ, Nicol F, Rae PW, Beech S, Guo Y, Arthur JR.

University Department of Clinical Chemistry, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, UK.

Abstract

This paper compares the effects of combined iodine and selenium deficiency, of single deficiencies of these trace elements, and of no deficiency on thyroid hormone metabolism in rats.

In rats deficient in both trace elements, thyroidal triiodothyronine (T3), thyroidal thyroxin (T4), thyroidal total iodine, hepatic T4, and plasma T4 were significantly lower, and plasma thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid weight were significantly higher than in rats deficient in iodine alone.

Plasma and hepatic T3 concentrations were similar in the dietary groups. Hepatic type I iodothyronine deiodinase (ID-I) activity was inhibited by selenium deficiency irrespective of the iodine status. Type II deiodinase (ID-II) activity in the brain was significantly higher and in pituitary, significantly lower in combined deficiency than in iodine deficiency alone.

These data show that selenium can play an important role in determining the severity of the hypothyroidism associated with iodine deficiency.

PMID:
8427196
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8427196

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Study: The impact of iron and selenium deficiencies on iodine and thyroid metabolism: biochemistry and relevance to public health.

Friday, July 1st, 2011

-:: This Abstract is posted here for posterity and archival purposes only ::-

Thyroid. 2002 Oct;12(10):867-78.

The impact of iron and selenium deficiencies on iodine and thyroid metabolism: biochemistry and relevance to public health.

Zimmermann MB, Köhrle J.

Laboratory for Human Nutrition, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland. Michael.zimmermann@ilw.agrt.ethz.ch
Abstract

Several minerals and trace elements are essential for normal thyroid hormone metabolism, e.g., iodine, iron, selenium, and zinc. Coexisting deficiencies of these elements can impair thyroid function.

Iron deficiency impairs thyroid hormone synthesis by reducing activity of heme-dependent thyroid peroxidase. Iron-deficiency anemia blunts and iron supplementation improves the efficacy of iodine supplementation.

Combined selenium and iodine deficiency leads to myxedematous cretinism. The normal thyroid gland retains high selenium concentrations even under conditions of inadequate selenium supply and expresses many of the known selenocysteine-containing proteins. Among these selenoproteins are the glutathione peroxidase, deiodinase, and thioredoxine reductase families of enzymes.

Adequate selenium nutrition supports efficient thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism and protects the thyroid gland from damage by excessive iodide exposure.

In regions of combined severe iodine and selenium deficiency, normalization of iodine supply is mandatory before initiation of selenium supplementation in order to prevent hypothyroidism.

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Too Much Fluoride/Bromide/Chlorine & Not Enough Iodine

Monday, June 13th, 2011

Is Salt Good of Bad?

Wednesday, June 8th, 2011

Doctors and dietitians, along with the USDA dietary guidelines, and the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend eating a diet low in sodium to prevent hypertension, risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke; most allopathic doctors place their patients on low-salt diets, they have since the 1970′s.

Not all salts are created equal. Many in the “Raw Food” movement (which has some great ideas to offer) shun salt away and even call it a poison. They fail to differentiate the different types of salts, table salt might be thought of as poison (or unhealthy) while other salts that are healthier do exist. Some salts actually increase mortality as I will show below.

Salt is an essential nutrient, unlike sugar, people ate salt for eons. Historically, humans recognized it’s importance enough to use it as currency. Its reputation is found in phrases like “Worth his/her salt,” or “Not worth his/her salt”  since people were often paid in salt. In fact, the word salt is derived from the Latin salarium, or salary. In fact, you could die without salt. Like I said, you need salt, “the right kind of salt”.

Mainstream, table, restaurant, shaker and processed food salts are often mixed with anti-caking agents, many avoid salt all together in order to avoid these added chemicals. Salt takes a large portion of the mainstream American awareness. People think it is an unnecessary additive, and guided by their allopathic doctors and government dietary guidelines they seek products that are salt-free. The situation with salt is very similar to that with fat, most Americans seek fat-free products failing to recognize that not all fat is bad.

Like fat, salt is an essential nutrient to life. The food industry might have transformed most of the salt into an unhealthy form of salt, but this is not to say that salt is bad. This is the case with fat, protein, rice, etc.. Many foods that are very healthy and essential become denatured and poisoned when commercially processed and packaged.

 

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About Iodine

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Iodine is essential,

I have hundreds of documents on iodine by about 10 different doctors that I will share here… so make sure you come back, I’m always adding content!  If you can’t wait email me a specific request or question.

I currently take 30-40 mg of iodine a day, with no side effects (i.e. detox symptoms)

You gotta research iodine well before you start taking it.

Quote:

Iodine taken in doses 100 times the RDA (100-150 micrograms/day) has important extrathyroidal benefits. These include its role as an antioxidant, in preventing and treating fibrocystic disease of the breast, and in preventing and treating cancer. In the right dose, iodine helps keep the immune system healthy, and it provides antiseptic mucosal defense in the mouth, stomach, and vagina. People who take iodine in milligram doses say that they feel healthier, have a sense of well being and increased energy.

Dr. Donald Miller

chelation, thyroid, detox, cancer, diet, midwest, brownstien, blaylock, toxicity, goiters, hashimotos, t3, t4

Iodine – 12.5 mg/day — two drops of 5% Lugol’s solution (5 cents/day) or one Iodoral tablet (26 cents/day)

 

This linke: http://curezone.com/forums/f.asp?f=815 will take you to the Iodine Supplementation Support Forum

Edgar Cayce’s Hair Loss Remedies – Pt. 2

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Please note, Cayce’s advice is not medical advice.. Do not apply crude oil on your scalp it contains benzene which is a known carcinogen.

It seems Glandular insufficiency and spinal lesions, according to the Cayce material, are by far the most common causes of hair loss (baldness).

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Here’s info that I found, was archived in 2009, the link is broken now, so here’s the text:

Quote:

BALDNESS
an Overview form the Cayce Health Database | edgarcayce.org Home Page

1. Physiological Considerations

Glandular insufficiency and spinal lesions (subluxations), according to the Cayce material, are by far the most common causes of hair loss (baldness) which may be accompanied by nail and even skin changes (abnormal pigmentation, vitiligo, etc.). Glandular dysfunction – usually the thyroid but the thymus and adrenals may also be involved may come about through the diet, i.e., insufficient amounts of necessary elements like calcium, or excesses of others like potassium. Other causes of glandular dysfunction include insufficient circulation, stress, infection, toxic chemicals (as found in cosmetics), general debilitation, etc.

The most commonly involved gland is the thyroid. It seems that when some elements necessary for proper thyroid functioning are missing, toxins which otherwise would have been eliminated are allowed to accumulate in the system. When this happens, inflammation, congestion, and circulatory disturbances occur, affecting the scalp and maybe the nails and skin. It is worth noting that the thyroid to some extent controls the circulation to the scalp, nails and skin, independent of the mechanism described above. When such disturbances occur, the outcome is hair loss with or without nail and skin changes, depending on the severity of the condition.

Impaired circulation from other causes may bring about the same effects without necessarily involving the thyroid or other glands, but is a much less common finding. The exception is spinal subluxation, being almost equally as frequent as glandular disturbance. It should be noted, though, that even when spinal subluxation is the primary condition, the glands often become involved as a result of impaired circulation through them (the thyroid especially). Hence in a large majority of cases the glands are either the primary or contributing cause of the condition.

In one or two instances, reference was made to prenatal tendencies as a contributory cause, but no definite information is available on this or on heredity.

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Heavy Metal Detox Supplements

Monday, January 31st, 2011

I’ve heard of a few good ways to chelate and cleanse the body of toxic heavy metals.

Here’s a list of the heavy metal chelating methods available:

  • OSR (oxidative stress relief)
  • Humifulvate
  • Toxguard
  • Modified Citrus Pectin / MCP / Sodium Alginate
  • ALA – alpha lipoic acid – lipoic acid
  • R-ALA – R alpha lipoic acid
  • Detoxamin
  • EDTA – ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid
  • Magnesium
  • Iodine
  • Silica Hydride
  • Chlorella – algae
  • Bentonite clay and Activated charcoal
  • MMS
  • Zeolites
  • Cilantro
  • DMPS – dimercaptopropane sulfonate sodium
  • Brazil Nuts
  • DMSA – dimercaptosuccinic acid
  • DMSO
  • Spirulina
  • Standard process catalyn and zinc liver chelate
  • Waiora’s NCD – natural cellular defense
  • Oral chelation/longevity plus
  • Dental mercury detox by sam and michael ziff
  • Selenium
  • Sulforaphane
  • garlic, sprouted broccoli seeds, anything that supports the liver, etc..

My favorites include Cilantro, Iodine, Chlorella, selenium, modified citrus pectin (MCP), and Humifulvate amongst others.

Some sources:

Enzymatic Therapy, Complete Metal Cleanse, 30 UltraCaps from iHerb or from Swanson’s: http://www.swansonvitamins.com/ET415/ItemDetail?n=0

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