Posts Tagged ‘Minerals’

Hyland’s Bioplasma Tablets – Reviews

Friday, January 18th, 2013

This particular product has very good comments by users.

Let’s start with Amazon, I copied and pasted the comments below, a part of it is so you can find all the comments here easily and also to preserve the comments for posterity.

 

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First, Amazon
From: http://www.amazon.com/Hylands-Bioplasma-Tablets-1000/dp/B00126349K/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

 

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reduced cravings observed., September 29, 2011

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About Zinc

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Zinc aids the immune system and the health of nails and hair. It stimulates hair and nail growth and aids in preventing hair loss. It also may help treat and prevent dandruff. Zinc is an antioxidant nutrient; necessary for protein synthesis; wound healing; vital for the development of the reproductive organs, prostate functions and male hormone activity; it governs the contractility of muscles; important for blood stability; maintains the body’s alkaline balance; helps in normal tissue function; aids in the digestion and metabolism of phosphorus.

Zinc is an essential trace mineral. The human body has between 1.5 – 2.5 g Zn, making it nearly as abundant as iron.

It is highly concentrated in specialized areas of the brain, pancreas and adrenal gland, but is present in all cells, particularly in the nucleus. Zinc has structural, catalytic (enzymatic) and regulatory roles. About 1% of the human genome codes for zinc finger proteins, where zinc provides a structural role for regulatory functions. Over 60 enzymes require zinc for activity, including the RNA polymerases. Zinc is actively taken up by synaptic vesicles, supporting a role in neuronal activity and memory.

Zinc metabolism is altered during disease and physical stress through hormones, cytokines and toxins, presumably as part of a host defense response.

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Deficiencies:

An early sign of zinc deficiency in animals is decreased food intake. It is a type II deficiency since a reduction in growth occurs without an apparent reduction in tissue zinc. Reduced immune function, involving B cell and T cell depletion and/or reduced activity, and skin lesions associated with secondary infections are common findings. Chronic zinc deficiency in humans results in reduced growth (dwarfism) and sexual development which are reversible by raising zinc intake. Signs of zinc deficiency may reflect its involvement in cell proliferation and differentiation. Growth, behavioral abnormalities and cognition may respond to zinc supplementation in some populations. Many clinical findings that relate to depressed growth or immunity may have marginal zinc deficiency as a secondary cause. May result in delayed sexual maturity, prolonged healing wounds, white spots on finger nails, retarded growth, stretch marks, fatigue, decreased alertness, susceptibility to infections.

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About Lithium

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Lithium

About 10-20mg of lithium per day may help support signal-carrying pathways in the brain, and protect and revitalize brain cells which can promote improvement in mood.

Quote:

Lithium is an alkali metal in the same family as sodium and potassium. In low doses (much less than those used to treat depression), lithium has anti-aging effects. It protects brain cells from damage from excitotoxins like glutamate, inhibits beta-amlyloid secretion (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease), and increases human brain grey matter, among other things. Lithium makes uric acid more soluble so it doesn’t crystallize into painful “needles” and cause gout. And it inhibits reproduction of viruses—herpes simplex, adenovirus (cold), and measles viruses.

Dr. Donald Miller

 

You could get it via Lithium Aspartate or Lithium Orotate:
Lithate (lithium aspartate) – 20 mg/day of elemental lithium
Lithium Orotate, pill or powder (topical use)

 

Sources:

http://www.easycart.net/cgi-bin/BeyondACenturyInc./search.cgi

http://www.iherb.com/Search?kw=Lithium

 

About Magnesium

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

Most of us are deficient in magnesium.

While this macro-mineral is easily obtained from many foods, magnesium deficiencies are extremely common for many Americans. Alcohol consumption, the presence of fluoride, and the consumption of certain foods either increase our need for magnesium, or decrease its absorption. Magnesium is not only one of the key nutrients required in both calcium utilization and protein synthesis, but it also plays a tremendous role in virtually every enzymatic reaction in our body.

Magnesium is a mineral that is critical for energy production and metabolism, muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission and bone mineralization. It is required cofactor for an estimated 300 enzymes. Among the reactions catalyzed by these enzymes are fatty acid synthesis, protein synthesis and glucose metabolism.

Essential for:

  • Nervous System Support
  • Energy Production
  • Enzyme Function
  • Bone health
  • Sleep and calmness
  • Decalcification
  • Regular bowel movement
  • Muscles and leg cramps

Quote:

Magnesium ions are essential to the basic nucleic acid chemistry of life, and 80 percent of the enzymes in the body need Mg in order to function. Mg deficiency can affect every organ system in the body. In skeletal muscles, Mg deficiency causes twitches, cramps, back aches, neck pain, tension headaches. With the heart Mg deficiency can cause angina (from spasm of the coronary arteries), high blood pressure, and rhythm disturbances, including sudden death.

Dr. Donald Miller

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Trace elements content and hormonal profiles in women with androgenetic alopecia

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2010 Dec 15.
Trace elements content and hormonal profiles in women with androgenetic alopecia.
Skalnaya MG, Tkachev VP.

Russian Society of Trace Elements in Medicine, Zemlyanoy Val str., 46, Moscow 105064, Russia; ANO “Centre for Biotic Medicine”, Zemlyanoy Val str., 46, Moscow 105064, Russia.

It is well-known that some trace element imbalances play a significant role in the pathomechanism of many forms of alopecia. Androgenetic alopecia, however, is a specific local sensitivity of hair follicle receptors to androgens.

In a clinical and laboratory study, 153 women with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and 32 control women were examined. In AGA patients telogen hair and vellus hair (miniaturization, D<30μm) significantly differed in frontal and parietal hair comparison with occipital area (20±0.9% vs. 12±0.5% and 33±0.9% vs. 12±0.6% respectively).

In the AGA group levels of androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone were higher than in the control group. Hair elemental content, analyzed by ICP-MS, demonstrated a lowered Cu and Zn content in the frontal area in comparison to the occipital area. It is important to note, that the AGA patients with elevated levels of androstenedione and dihydrotestosterone presented an increased Cu content and decreased Mn, Se, Zn contents in the occipital area of scalp. The occipital level of Cu positively correlated with the concentration of free testosterone in the serum.

A negative correlation between the Zn content in the occipital area and the dehydroepiandrosterone level in the blood was found.

Unfortunately, a routine treatment course of AGA patients, including topical inhibitor of 5-alpha-reductase and minoxidil, had no effect on the Cu hair content in occipital and frontal areas.

However, there were positive changes in the morphological structure and other trace element contents. These data led us to hypothesize a key role of Cu metabolism disturbances in the AGA onset, development of AGA, and potential pharmaceutical targets for the treatment of AGA.

About Selenium

Sunday, January 16th, 2011

Selenium and Methylselenocysteine

Selenium is an essential trace mineral that is essential for life. It is also a toxic metal when consumed in excess. Selenium is required to activate various key enzymes, including the antioxidant glutathione peroxidase, the metabolic enzyme thioredoxin reductase, and the thyroid-hormone-activating enzyme iodothyronine deiodinase. Food sources of selenium include brazil nuts, yeast, whole grains and seafood. Selenium content of food is dependent on selenium content in the soil and both are highly variable.
Selenium: The Anticancer Mineral

Epidemological studies recognized a connection between cancer incidence and low levels of selenium in the blood as early as 1969. Researchers noted that breast cancer rates were low in areas where selenium levels in the soil and food were high and high in areas where selenium levels were low. The same correlation was found between death rates and selenium levels. Similar correlations were subsequently found in animal studies.
Helps in treatment and prevention of dandruff. Necessary for healthy hair and nails. May also increase the elastic youthfulness of the skin and be helpful in removing age spots. When ingested in the natural algae form of selenomethionine, skin cancer incidence from ultraviolet light may also be reduced.
Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element that functions as a component of enzymes involved in antioxidant protection and thyroid hormone metabolism. In several intra- and extra-cellular glutathione peroxidases, iodothyronine 5н-deiodinases, and in thioredoxin reductase, selenium is located at the active centers as the selenoamino acid, selenocysteine (SeCYS). At least two other proteins of unknown function also contain SeCYS. Although SeCYS is an important dietary form, it is not directly incorporated into these specific selenium-proteins; instead, a co-translational process yields tRNA-bound SeCYS. In contrast, selenium as seleno-methionine is incorporated non-specifically into many proteins, as it competes with methionine in general protein synthesis. Therefore, tissues often contain both specific, as well as the nonspecific, selenium-containing proteins when both SeCYS and selenomethionine are consumed, as found in many foods.

IMPORTANCE: A major antioxidant nutrient, protects cell membranes and prevents free radical generation thereby decreasing the risk of cancer and disease of the heart and blood vessels. Medical surveys show that increased selenium intake decreases the risk of breast, colon, lung and prostate cancer. Selenium also preserves tissue elasticity; slows down the aging and hardening of tissues through oxidation; helps in the treatment and prevention of dandruff.

Deficiencies: Selenium deprivation reduces activities of the selenium-dependent enzymes. The signs in animals depend upon vitamin E status and appear only when both nutrients are limiting. They vary according to species. For example, selenium- and vitamin E-deficient animals show myopathies of skeletal (e.g., sheep, cow, horse), cardiac (pig) or smooth (dog, cow) muscle; hepatic necrosis (rat, pig); increased capillary permeability (chicken); or pancreatic acinar degeneration (chicken). Characteristic signs of selenium deficiency have not been described in humans, but very low selenium status is a factor in the etiologies of a juvenile cardiomyopathy (Keshan Disease) and a chondrodystrophy (Kashin-Beck Disease) that occur in selenium-deficient regions of China. May result in premature aging, heart disease, dandruff, loose skin.

Diet recommendations: The Recommended Dietary Allowances are in µg/day: 0-0.5 yrs, 10; 0.5-1.0 yrs, 15; 1-6 yrs, 20; 7-10 yrs, 30; males 11-14 yrs, 40; females 11-14 yrs, 45; males and females 15-18 yrs, 50; adult males, 70; adult females, 55; pregnancy, 65; and lactation, 75.

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On Multi Vitamin Supplements

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

Research has shown that we cannot get enough nutrients from diet alone (partially due to depleted soils, modern farming, less-healthy animals and commercial processing)  however I do not use a multi-vitamin supplement.

There are thousands multivitamin supplements each boasting special ingredients. I find this confusing, also the manufacturers cannot possibly put everything I need in a pill. The processing involved also is something I like to avoid.

In some cases multivitamins have been found to contain contamination (more processing more risk of contamination or damage to nutrients). Many of these also use synthetic vitamins which I like to avoid (you can overdose on synthetic nutrients more readily than natural ones).

In reality, I like to get my multi-vitamins and multi-minerals from “whole food sources” like Desiccated liver, Brewer’s Yeast, Chlorella, Spirulina, Bee Pollen, Royal Jelly, etc.

I have not seen one “healthy hair” supplement that has everything in the correct form, and in enough quantities. I prefer to take specific supplements, at good dosage and high quality in addition to super foods and a good diet.

With a very few exceptions for some multi vitamins.. one of them is the Mega Food brand. They make a good Vitamin B complex and a good one daily multi vitamin.

I prefer vegetable capsules over ones made of magnesium stearate, soybeans (most likely genetically modified cheap stuff), maltodextrose, or gelatin.

Updated: 5/13/2011

140+ Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

The following list was written by Nancy Appleton, Ph.D. (visit her very informative website www.nancyappleton.com), the author of the book Lick The Sugar Habit.

In addition to throwing off the body’s homeostasis, excess sugar may result in a number of other significant consequences. The following is a listing of some of sugar’s metabolic consequences from a variety of medical journals and other scientific publications.

141 Reasons Sugar Ruins Your Health

(Just Kidding, it’s 143)

By Nancy Appleton PhD & G.N. Jacobs

Excerpted from Suicide by Sugar

Used with permission

1. Sugar can suppress your immune system.

2. Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.

3. Sugar can cause juvenile delinquency in children.

4. Sugar eaten during pregnancy and lactation can influence muscle force production in offspring, which can affect an individual’s ability to exercise.

5. Sugar in soda, when consumed by children, results in the children drinking less milk.

6. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses and return them to fasting levels slower in oral contraceptive users.

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