Posts Tagged ‘Obesity’

Study: Fat maintenance is a predictor of the murine lifespan response to dietary restriction

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

This article archives the study titled: Fat maintenance is a predictor of the murine lifespan response to dietary restriction:

1) Article

Article: Mouse study turns fat-loss/longevity link on its head – Science Daily, 5/3/11

“studied the effect of food restriction on fat and weight loss in 41 genetically different strains of mice. The scientists then correlated the amount of fat reduction to life span … The answer: Mice that maintained their fat actually lived longer. Those that lost fat died earlier … People are best advised to adopt a moderate approach, not losing all fat but definitely not keeping unhealthy amounts of fat, either … None of the mice in this study were what we would consider to be obese”

Archived article: Mouse-Study-Turns-Fat-Loss-longevity-Link-on-Its-Head.pdf

2) Journal reference:

Chen-Yu Liao, Brad A. Rikke, Thomas E. Johnson, Jonathan A.L. Gelfond, Vivian Diaz, James F. Nelson. Fat Maintenance Is a Predictor of the Murine Lifespan Response to Dietary Restriction. Aging Cell, 2011; DOI: 10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00702.x

Journal Summary:

Fat maintenance is a predictor of the murine lifespan response to dietary restriction     1. Chen-Yu Liao1,2,    2. Brad A. Rikke3,    3. Thomas E. Johnson3,4,    4. Jonathan A. L. Gelfond2,5,    5. Vivian Diaz2,    6. James F. Nelson1,2  Article first published online: 25 APR 2011  DOI: 10.1111/j.1474-9726.2011.00702.x
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Insulin Resistance Article – Archived

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-
Thanks to medscape.com for this invaluable article

Insulin Resistance

Background

Insulin resistance is a state in which a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. Insulin resistance has also been arbitrarily defined as the requirement of 200 or more units of insulin per day to attain glycemic control and to prevent ketosis.

The syndromes of insulin resistance actually make up a broad clinical spectrum, which includes obesity, glucose intolerance, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome, as well as an extreme insulin-resistant state. Many of these disorders are associated with various endocrine, metabolic, and genetic conditions. These syndromes may also be associated with immunological diseases and may exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics.

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The metabolic syndrome —a state of insulin-resistance that is also known as either syndrome X or the dysmetabolic syndrome—has drawn the greatest attention because of its public health importance.

In an effort to clinically identify patients with insulin resistance, various organizations have developed diagnostic criteria. The most commonly used criteria in the United States are those of the National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III).

  • NCEP/ATP III criteria for the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome include the following (diagnosis is made when 3 or more are present):
    • Waist circumference of more than 102 cm in men or more than 88 cm in women
    • Fasting triglyceride level of 150 mg/dL or higher
    • Blood pressure level of 130/85 mm Hg or higher
    • High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level of less than 40 mg/dL in men or less than 50 mg/dL in women
    • Fasting glucose level of 110 mg/dL or higher (which has been changed to 100 mg/dL to reflect revised criteria for impaired fasting glucose [IFG])

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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Oct;71(4):494-9. “Androgenetic alopecia and insulin resistance in young men”

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Oct;71(4):494-9.

Androgenetic alopecia and insulin resistance in young men.

González-González JG, Mancillas-Adame LG, Fernández-Reyes M, Gómez-Flores M, Lavalle-González FJ, Ocampo-Candiani J, Villarreal-Pérez JZ.

Servicio de Endocrinologia, Dr Jose Eleuterio Gonzalez University Hospital, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Ave. Madero y Gonzalitos S/N, Monterrey, Mexico. jgonzalezg@fm.uanl.mx

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have associated androgenetic alopecia (AGA) with severe young-age coronary artery disease and hypertension, and linked it to insulin resistance. We carried out a case-control study in age- and weight-matched young males to study the link between AGA and insulin resistance using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index or metabolic syndrome clinical manifestations.

METHODS: Eighty young males, 18-35 years old, with AGA > or = stage III in the Hamilton-Norwood classification, and 80 weight- and age-matched controls were included. Alopecia, glucose, serum insulin, HOMA-IR index, lipid profile and androgen levels, as well as metabolic syndrome criteria, were evaluated.

RESULTS: The HOMA-IR index was significantly higher in cases than controls. Nonobese cases had a higher mean diastolic blood pressure and a more frequent family history of AGA than nonobese controls. A borderline difference in the HOMA-IR index was found in obese AGA cases vs. obese controls [P = 0.055, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.36-4.20 vs. 1.75-2.73]. Free testosterone values were significantly higher in controls than cases, regardless of body mass index (BMI). A statistically significant additive effect for obesity plus alopecia was found, with significant trends for insulin, the HOMA-IR index, lipids and free testosterone when BMI and alopecia status were used to classify the participants.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the recommendation for assessing insulin resistance and cardiovascular-related features and disorders in all young males with stage III or higher AGA, according to the Hamilton-Norwood classification.

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Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6 “Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance”

Tuesday, August 17th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

Lancet. 2000 Sep 30;356(9236):1165-6.

Early androgenetic alopecia as a marker of insulin resistance.

Matilainen V, Koskela P, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S.

Abstract

The previously proven association between androgenetic, alopecia and serious cardiovascular events raises a question of the common pathogenetic mechanism of these disorders. Our practice-based case-control study in men aged 19-50 years showed a strikingly increased risk of hyperinsulinaemia and insulin-resistance-associated disorders such as obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia in men with early onset of alopecia (<35), compared with age-matched controls.

This finding supports the hypothesis that early androgenetic alopecia could be a clinical marker of insulin resistance.

PMID: 11030300 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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