Posts Tagged ‘Sex Steroids’

TCM for Hair Loss and Hair Health

Friday, December 10th, 2010

TCM, or Traditional Chinese Medicine, as we call it in the U.S. is an ancient system of healing practiced in China for thousands of years. TCM is viewed as a science in its own right in China. Taoists have a very interesting approach to health that does work despite it using different methodologies and theories than Western Medicine. Some of the modalities related to TCM include acupuncture, acupressure, herbology, QiGong, etc.

This article is not about TCM, Chi channels, acupuncture points. But, interesting it suffices to know that TCM has solutions to hair loss. Acupuncture, acupressure and even Internal and External QiGong have been sighted to help hair health and stopping hair loss.

If you are interested in acupuncture, acupressure, or external QiGong (energy healing): You could call a few practitioners and see if they have helped others with their hair or baldness.

The good news is: There are quite a few things you could do on your own!

Tai Chi and QiGong: You could learn these amazing techniques and heal yourself. Many miraculous healing stories exist shared especially amongst Spring Forest QiGong. If you do not believe in Chi, Meridians and energy that is fine!  Tai Chi and QiGong have a very powerful relaxing effect on the body and mind. Try it simply for relaxation. We all know how bad stress and anxiety can be for hair!

Read more on QiGong here (to be added soon)

Plants:

1- Fo-ti: Is well known amongst individuals and herbal stores to promote hair growth. No scientific evidence exists yet.
Read more about Fo-Ti here (to be added soon)

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J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?”

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3.

Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?

Signorello LB, Wuu J, Hsieh C, Tzonou A, Trichopoulos D, Mantzoros CS.

Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

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BACKGROUND: Androgens are important in hair growth and patterning, whereas growth hormone substitution enhances their effect in growth hormone-deficient men. No previous study has jointly evaluated the function of sex steroids, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) in determining hair patterning in men.

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the relationship between circulating hormone measurements and both head and chest hair patterning in a sample of elderly men.

METHODS: Fifty-one apparently healthy men older than 65 years of age were studied cross-sectionally. Head and chest hair patterning was assessed by a trained interviewer. Morning blood samples from all subjects were used for measurements of testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, SHBG, and IGF-1.

RESULTS: Results were obtained from logistic regression models, adjusting simultaneously for all the measured hormones and age. Men with higher levels of testosterone were more likely to have vertex baldness (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI: 0.9 to 7.8] per 194 ng/dL increment of testosterone). In addition, for each 59 ng/mL increase in IGF-1, the odds of having vertex baldness doubled (95% CI [1.0 to 4.6]). Those who were found to have higher circulating levels of SHBG were less likely to have dense hair on their chest (OR = 0.4, 95% CI [0.1 to 0.9] per 24 nmol/L increment in SHBG]).

CONCLUSION: Testosterone, SHBG, and IGF-1 may be important in determining hair patterning in men.

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