Posts Tagged ‘SHBG’

Glycemic Index, Insulin resistance and IGF-1

Monday, December 13th, 2010

There is a link between hair loss and Insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and IGF-1.

The studies below show that men with vertex balding had increased (higher) levels of circulating Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and decreased (lower) levels of circulating Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 3 (IGFBP-3).

J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?”

evaluated the function of “sex steroids”, “sex hormone-binding globulin” (SHBG), and “insulin-like growth factor” (IGF-1) in determining hair-loss patterning in men. This study found that “for each 59 ng/mL increase in IGF-1, the odds of having vertex baldness doubled” and that “Testosterone, SHBG, and IGF-1 may be important in determining hair patterning in men.”

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000 Jun;42(6):1003-7. “Vertex balding, plasma insulin-like growth factor 1, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3″ Found that  “Older men with vertex balding have lower circulating levels of IGFBP-3 and higher levels of IGF-1 when controlling for IGFBP-3 level.”

A link between IGF-1 and glucose intolerance / insulin resistance

Studies suggest that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) could be important determinants of glucose homoeostasis. The study below indicates that low IGF-1 levels are associated with the development of insulin resistance and provides “further evidence for the possible protective role of IGF-I against development of glucose intolerance.”

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Calorie-restriction, Protein-restriction and free-IGF-1 / SHBG

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Studies pertaining to Calorie-restriction (CR), Protein-restriction (PR) and free-IGF-1 and SHBG.

1)

Br J Cancer. 2000 Jul;83(1):95-7.
Hormones and diet: low insulin-like growth factor-I but normal bioavailable androgens in vegan men.

Allen NE, Appleby PN, Davey GK, Key TJ.
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Imperial Cancer Research Fund, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

Mean serum insulin-like growth factor-I was 9% lower in 233 vegan men than in 226 meat-eaters and 237 vegetarians (P = 0.002).

Vegans had higher testosterone levels than vegetarians and meat-eaters, but this was offset by higher sex hormone binding globulin, and there were no differences between diet groups in free testosterone, androstanediol glucuronide or luteinizing hormone.

PMID: 10883675 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]PMCID: PMC2374537

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10883675

Full text PDF: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2374537/pdf/83-6691152a.pdf
PDF file: Hormones and diet-83-6691152a.pdf

2)

Aging Cell. 2008 Oct;7(5):681-7.
Long-term effects of calorie or protein restriction on serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 concentration in humans.

Fontana L, Weiss EP, Villareal DT, Klein S, Holloszy JO.

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Free-IGF-1 lowers SHBG | Acne, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, Hyperinsulinemia and Diet

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

1)

Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1584-90.
Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization.

Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J.
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA. cordain@cahs.colostate.edu
Comment in:
* Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1591-2.
* Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):941; author reply 942-3.
* Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):941-2; author reply 942-3.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In westernized societies, acne vulgaris is a nearly universal skin disease afflicting 79% to 95% of the adolescent population. In men and women older than 25 years, 40% to 54% have some degree of facial acne, and clinical facial acne persists into middle age in 12% of women and 3% of men. Epidemiological evidence suggests that acne incidence rates are considerably lower in nonwesternized societies. Herein we report the prevalence of acne in 2 nonwesternized populations: the Kitavan Islanders of Papua New Guinea and the Aché hunter-gatherers of Paraguay. Additionally, we analyze how elements in nonwesternized environments may influence the development of acne.

OBSERVATIONS: Of 1200 Kitavan subjects examined (including 300 aged 15-25 years), no case of acne (grade 1 with multiple comedones or grades 2-4) was observed. Of 115 Aché subjects examined (including 15 aged 15-25 years) over 843 days, no case of active acne (grades 1-4) was observed.

CONCLUSIONS: The astonishing difference in acne incidence rates between nonwesternized and fully modernized societies cannot be solely attributed to genetic differences among populations but likely results from differing environmental factors. Identification of these factors may be useful in the treatment of acne in Western populations.

PMID: 12472346 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3. “Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?”

Wednesday, August 18th, 2010

-::- Note: The below is published here for archival purposes -::-

J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999 Feb;40(2 Pt 1):200-3.

Hormones and hair patterning in men: a role for insulin-like growth factor 1?

Signorello LB, Wuu J, Hsieh C, Tzonou A, Trichopoulos D, Mantzoros CS.

Department of Epidemiology and Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Androgens are important in hair growth and patterning, whereas growth hormone substitution enhances their effect in growth hormone-deficient men. No previous study has jointly evaluated the function of sex steroids, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) in determining hair patterning in men.

OBJECTIVE: We assessed the relationship between circulating hormone measurements and both head and chest hair patterning in a sample of elderly men.

METHODS: Fifty-one apparently healthy men older than 65 years of age were studied cross-sectionally. Head and chest hair patterning was assessed by a trained interviewer. Morning blood samples from all subjects were used for measurements of testosterone, estradiol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, SHBG, and IGF-1.

RESULTS: Results were obtained from logistic regression models, adjusting simultaneously for all the measured hormones and age. Men with higher levels of testosterone were more likely to have vertex baldness (odds ratio [OR] = 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI: 0.9 to 7.8] per 194 ng/dL increment of testosterone). In addition, for each 59 ng/mL increase in IGF-1, the odds of having vertex baldness doubled (95% CI [1.0 to 4.6]). Those who were found to have higher circulating levels of SHBG were less likely to have dense hair on their chest (OR = 0.4, 95% CI [0.1 to 0.9] per 24 nmol/L increment in SHBG]).

CONCLUSION: Testosterone, SHBG, and IGF-1 may be important in determining hair patterning in men.

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